U.S. Coins by Type

This page contains the list of all Federal Issues by denomination type and major variety. Federal Issues are coins that have been struck only at the U.S. Mint since the passage of the Coinage Act of 1792.

Varieties (or Types) listed are major coin types. Although the naming conventions may differ amongst references, the ones listed here are generally considered the significant types for each coin listed. Some coins add and remove embellishments, such as the arrows around dates, to show a change in alloys or weight. It is left as an exercise to the reader to look up the reasons for some of the changes.

Some varieties may show multiple dates because they were temporarily changed and returned to production after a certain period of time. Others may not show consecutive dates because coins may not have been produced in certain years.

Coins with dates in the future are scheduled for production in those years.

Last updated on October 29, 2017.

Half Cents

  • Liberty Cap (1793-1797)
    • Type 1: Head Facing Left (1793)
    • Type 2: Head Facing Right (1794-1797)
  • Draped Bust (1800-1808)
  • Classic Head (1809-1836)
  • Braided Hair (1840-1857)

Large Cents

  • Flowing Hair (1793)
    • Type 1: Chain Reverse (1793)
    • Type 2: Wreath Reverse (1793)
  • Liberty Cap (1793-1796)
  • Draped Bust (1796-1807)
  • Classic Head (1808-1814)
  • Matron Head (1816-1839)
  • Braided Hair (1839-1857)

Small Cents

  • Flying Eagle (1856-1858)
  • Indian Head (1859-1909)
    • Type 1: Copper-Nickel, Laurel Wreath Reverse (1859)
    • Type 2: Copper-Nickel, Oak Wreath with Shield (1860-1864)
    • Type 3: Bronze (1864-1909)
  • Lincoln Cent (1909-present)
    • Type 1: Wheat Ear Reverse (1909-1958)
    • Type 2: Zinc-coated Steel (1943)
    • Type 3: Memorial Reverse (1959-2008)
    • Type 4: Lincoln Bicentennial Series (2009)
      • 1. Birth and early childhood in Kentucky (1809-1816)
      • 2. Formative years in Indiana (1816-1830)
      • 3. Professional Life in Illinois (1830-1861)
      • 4. Presidency in Washington, DC (1861-1865)
    • Type 5: Shield Reverse (2010-present)
      • Type 5a: Shield Reverse with “P” mintmark (2017)

Two Cents

  • Shield Design (1864-1873)

Three Cents

  • Silver (Trime) (1851-1873)
  • Nickel (1865-1889)

Half Dimes (5 cents)

  • Flowing Hair (1794-1795)
  • Draped Bust (1796-1805)
    • Type 1: Small Eagle Reverse (1796-1797)
    • Type 2: Heraldic Eagle Reverse (1800-1805)
  • Capped Bust (1829-1837)
  • Seated Liberty (1837-1873)
    • Type 1: No Stars on Obverse (1837-1838)
    • Type 2: Stars on Obverse (1838-1853, 1856-1859)
    • Type 3: Arrows at Date (1853-1855)
    • Type 4: Legend on Obverse (1860-1874)

Five Cents (Nickels)

  • Shield (1866-1883)
    • Type 1: With Rays between the stars on the reverse (1866-1867)
    • Type 2: Without Rays between the stars on the reverse (1868-1883)
  • Liberty Head (1883-1913)
    • Type 1: Without Cents on Reverse (1883) [Racketeer Nickel]
    • Type 2: With Cents on Reverse (1883-1913)
  • Indian Head (Buffalo) (1913-1938)
    • Type 1: Five Cents on Raised Ground (1913) [Buffalo Standing on a Mound]
    • Type 2: Five Cents Recessed (1913-1938) [Buffalo Standing on a Line]
  • Jefferson (1938-present)
    • Type 1: Left-Facing Portrait (1938-2003)
    • Type 2: Wartime Silver Alloy (1942-1945)
    • Type 3: Westward Journey Nickel Series (2004-2005)
      • 1. Peace Medal Reverse (2004)
      • 2. Keelboat Reverse (2004)
      • 3. New Obverse Portrait with Handwritten “Liberty” and American Bison Reverse (2005)
      • 4. New Obverse Portrait with Handwritten “Liberty” and “Ocean in View” Reverse (2005)
    • Type 4: Front Facing Portrait (2006-present)

Ten Cents (Dimes)

  • Draped Bust (1796-1807)
    • Type 1: Small Eagle Reverse (1795-1797)
    • Type 2: Heraldic Eagle Reverse (1797-1807)
  • Capped Bust (1809-1837)
    • Type 1: Wide Border (1809-1828)
    • Type 2: Modified Design (1828-1837)
  • Seated Liberty (1837-1891)
    • See seateddimevarieties.com for more information about Seated Liberty Dime Varieites
    • Type 1: No Stars on Obverse (1837-1838)
    • Type 2: Stars on Obverse, No Drapery Under Right Elbow (1838-1840)
    • Type 3: Stars on Obverse, With Drapery Under Right Elbow (1840-1860)
    • Type 4: Type 3 design with Arrows around Date (1853-1855)
    • Type 5: Legend on Obverse [Type I], Longacre “Wreath of Cereal” Reverse [Type I] (1860-1861)
    • Type 6: Legend on Obverse [Type II], “Wreath of Cereal” Reverse [Type I] (1861-1873, 1875-1878)
    • Type 7: Type 6 design with Arrows around the Date (1873-1874)
    • Type 8: Legend on Obverse [Type II], W. Barber “Wreath of Cereal” Reverse [Type II] (1876-1891)
  • Barber “Liberty Head” (1892-1916)
  • Winged Liberty Head “Mercury” (1916-1945)
  • Roosevelt (1946-present)
    • Type 1: Silver Coinage (1946-1964)
    • Type 2: Copper-nickel Clad Coinage (1965-present)

Twenty Cents

  • Liberty Seated (1875-1878)

Quarter Dollars

  • Draped Bust (1796-1807)
    • Type 1: Small Eagle Reverse (1796)
    • Type 2: Heraldic Eagle Reverse (1804-1807)
  • Capped Bust (1815-1838)
    • Type 1: Large Diameter [27 millimeters] (1815-1828)
    • Type 2: Reduced Diameter [24.3 millimeters] (1831-1838)
  • Seated Liberty (1838-1891)
    • Type 1: No Motto Above the Eagle (1838-1853, 1856-1865)
    • Type 2: Arrows at Date on obverse, Rays Around the Eagle on reverse (1853)
    • Type 3: Arrows at Date on obverse, No Rays on Reverse (1854-1855)
    • Type 4: Motto Above the Eagle on Reverse (1866-1873, 1875-1891)
    • Type 5: Arrows at the Date (1873-1874)
  • Barber “Liberty Head” (1892-1916)
  • Standing Liberty (1916-1930)
    • Type 1: No Stars Below the Eagle (1916-1917)
    • Type 2: Stars Below the Eagle, date on raised Pedestal (1917-1924)
    • Type 3: Stars Below the Eagle, date recessed on Pedestal (1925-1930)
  • Washington (1932-present)
    • Type 1: Silver Coinage (1932-1964)
    • Type 2: Copper-nickel Clad (1964-present)
    • Type 3: Bicentennial (Drummer Boy) Reverse (1975-1976)
    • 50 States Quarters™ (1999-2008)
      • 1999: Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Georgia, Connecticut
      • 2000: Massachusetts, Maryland, South Carolina, New Hampshire, Virginia
      • 2001: New York, North Carolina, Rhode Island, Vermont, Kentucky
      • 2002: Tennessee, Ohio, Louisiana, Indiana, Mississippi
      • 2003: Illinois, Alabama, Maine, Missouri, Arkansas
      • 2004: Michigan, Florida, Texas, Iowa, Wisconsin
      • 2005: California, Minnesota, Oregon, Kansas, West Virginia
      • 2006: Nevada, Nebraska, Colorado, North Dakota, South Dakota
      • 2007: Montana, Washington, Idaho, Wyoming, Utah
      • 2008: Oklahoma, New Mexico, Arizona, Alaska, Hawaii
    • District of Columbia and U.S Territories (2009)
      • 1. District of Columbia
      • 2. The Commonwealth of Puerto Rico
      • 3. Guam
      • 4. American Samoa
      • 5. The U.S. Virgin Islands
      • 6. Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands
    • America the Beautiful Quarters® (2010-2021)
      2010:
      Hot Springs National Park (Arkansas)
       
      Yellowstone National Park (Wyoming)
       
      Yosemite National Park (California)
       
      Grand Canyon National Park (Arizona)
       
      Mount Hood National Forest (Oregon)
      2011:
      Gettysburg National Military Park (Pennsylvania)
       
      Glacier National Park (Montana)
       
      Olympic National Park (Washington)
       
      Vicksburg National Military Park (Mississippi)
       
      Chickasaw National Recreation Area (Oklahoma)
      2012:
      El Yunque National Forest (Puerto Rico)
       
      Chaco Culture National Historical Park (New Mexico)
       
      Acadia National Park (Maine)
       
      Hawaii Volcanoes National Park (Hawaii)
       
      Denali National Park (Alaska)
      2013:
      White Mountain National Forest (New Hampshire)
       
      Perry’s Victory and International Peace Memorial (Ohio)
       
      Great Basin National Park (Nevada)
       
      Fort McHenry National Monument and Historic Shrine (Maryland)
       
      Mount Rushmore National Memorial (South Dakota)
      2014:
      Great Smoky Mountains National Park (Tennessee)
       
      Shenandoah National Park (Virginia)
       
      Arches National Park (Utah)
       
      Great Sand Dunes National Park (Colorado)
       
      Everglades National Park (Florida)
      2015:
      Homestead National Monument of America (Nebraska)
       
      Kisatchie National Forest (Louisiana)
       
      Blue Ridge Parkway (North Carolina)
       
      Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge (Delaware)
       
      Saratoga National Historical Park (New York)
      2016:
      Shawnee National Forest (Illinois)
       
      Cumberland Gap National Historical Park (Kentucky)
       
      Harpers Ferry National Historical Park (West Virginia)
       
      Theodore Roosevelt National Park (North Dakota)
       
      Fort Moultrie (Fort Sumter National Monument) (South Carolina)
      2017:
      Effigy Mounds National Monument (Iowa)
       
      Frederick Douglass National Historic Site (District of Columbia)
       
      Ozark National Scenic Riverways (Missouri)
       
      Ellis Island National Monument (Statue of Liberty) (New Jersey)
       
      George Rogers Clark National Historical Park (Indiana)
      2018:
      Pictured Rock National Lakeshore (Michigan)
       
      Apostle Islands National Lakeshore (Wisconsin)
       
      Voyageurs National Park (Minnesota)
       
      Cumberland Island National Seashore (Georgia)
       
      Block Island National Wildlife Refuge (Rhode Island)
      2019:
      Lowell National Historical Park (Massachusetts)
       
      American Memorial Park (Northern Mariana Islands)
       
      War in the Pacific National Historical Park (Guam)
       
      San Antonio Missions National Historical Park (Texas)
       
      Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness (Idaho)
      2020:
      National Park of American Samoa (American Samoa)
       
      Weir Farm National Historic Site (Connecticut)
       
      Salt River Bay National Historical Park and Ecological Preserve (U.S. Virgin Islands)
       
      Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park (Vermont)
       
      Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve (Kansas)
      2021:
      Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site (Alabama)

Half Dollars

  • Flowing Hair (1794-1795)
  • Draped Bust (1796-1807)
    • Type 1: Small Eagle Reverse (1796-1797)
    • Type 2: Heraldic Eagle Reverse (1801-1807)
  • Capped Bust (1807-1839)
    • Type 1: Lettered Edge, First Style (1807-1808)
    • Type 2: Lettered Edge, Second Style (1809-1836)
    • Type 3: Reeded Edge, “50 CENTS” on Reverse (1836-1837)
    • Type 4: Reeded Edge, “HALF DOL.” on Reverse (1838-1839)
  • Seated Liberty (1839-1891)
    • Type 1: No Motto Above the Eagle on Reverse (1839-1853, 1856-1866)
    • Type 2: Arrows at the Date, Rays Around the Eagle on Reverse (1853)
    • Type 3: Arrows at the Date, no Rays (1854-1855)
    • Type 4: Motto Above Eagle on Reverse (1866-1873, 1875-1891)
    • Type 5: Arrows at the Date (1873-1874)
  • Barber “Liberty Head” (1892-1915)
  • Walking Liberty (1916-1947)
  • Franklin Head (1948-1963)
  • Kennedy Head (1964-present)
    • Type 1: Silver Coinage (1964)
    • Type 2: Silver Clad Coinage (1965-1970)
    • Type 3: Copper-nickel Clad Coinage (1971-present)
    • Type 4: Bicentennial (Independence Hall) Reverse (1975-1976)

One Dollar

  • Flowing Hair (1794-1795)
  • Draped Bust (1795-1804)
    • Type 1: Small Eagle Reverse (1795-1798)
    • Type 2: Heraldic Eagle Reverse (1798-1804)
  • Gobrecht Dollars (1836-1839)
  • Seated Liberty (1840-1873)
    • Type 1: No Motto on Reverse (1840-1865)
    • Type 2: With Motto “IN GOD WE TRUST” on Reverse (1866-1873)
  • Trade (1873-1885)
  • Morgan (1878-1921)
  • Peace (1921-1964)
  • Eisenhower (1971-1978)
    • Type 1: Eagle Reverse (1971-1974, 1977-1978)
    • Type 2: Bicentennial (Liberty Bell) Reverse (1975-1976)
  • Susan B. Anthony (1979-1999)
  • Sacagawea (2000-present)
    • Type 1: Eagle Reverse (2000-2008)
    • Type 2: Native American $1 Coin Program (2009-present) with edge lettering
      • 2009: Spread of Three Sisters Agriculture (1000 A.D.)
      • 2010: Great Tree of Peace (early 1400s)
      • 2011: Diplomacy—Treaties with Tribal Nations
      • 2012: Trade and Economy
      • 2013: Delaware Treaty of 1778
      • 2014: Native Hospitality Ensured the Success of the Lewis and Clark Expedition
      • 2015: Mohawk high iron workers, builders of New York City and other skylines
      • 2016: Code Talkers from both World War I and World War II
      • 2017: Sequoyah: George Gist, Cherokee (1776-1843)
      • 2018: Jim Thorpe
      • 2019: Native Americans in Space
      • 2020: Anti-Discrimination Act of 1945
  • Presidential $1 Program (2007-2016)
    NOTE:
    President must be deceased for two years prior to appearing on a dollar coin. The program ends with the last deceased president. The program ended with Ronald Reagan bypassing Jimmy Carter who was still living in 2016.
    • 2007: George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison
    • 2008: James Monroe, John Quincy Adams, Andrew Jackson, Martin Van Buren
    • 2009: William Henry Harrison, John Tyler, James K. Polk, Zachary Taylor
    • 2010: Millard Fillmore, Franklin Pierce, James Buchanan, Abraham Lincoln
    • 2011: Andrew Johnson, Ulysses S. Grant, Rutherford B. Hayes, James Garfield
    • 2012: Chester A. Arthur, Grover Cleveland, Benjamin Harrison, Grover Cleveland
    • 2013: William McKinley, Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, Woodrow Wilson
    • 2014: Warren Harding, Calvin Coolidge, Herbert Hoover, Franklin D. Roosevelt
    • 2015: Harry S Truman, Dwight D. Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson
    • 2016: Richard M. Nixon, Gerald Ford, Ronald Reagan

$1 Gold

  • Liberty Head (1849-1854)
  • Indian Princess (1854-1889)
    • Type 1: Small Head (1854-1856)
    • Type 2: Large Head (1856-1889)

$2½ Gold Quarter Eagle

  • Turban Head (1796-1807)
  • Capped Bust (1808-1834)
    • Type 1: Bust Facing Left, Large Size (1808)
    • Type 2: Capped Head Facing Left, Large Diameter (1821-1827)
    • Type 3: Capped Head Facing Left, Reduced Diameter (1829-1834)
  • Classic Head (1834-1839)
  • Liberty Head (1840-1907)
  • Indian Head (1908-1929)

$3 Gold

  • Indian Princess Head (1854-1889)

$5 Gold Half Eagles

  • Turban Head (1795-1807)
    • Type 1: Small Eagle on Reverse (1795-1798)
    • Type 2: Heraldic Eagle on Reverse (1795-1807)
  • Capped Bust (1807-1834)
    • Type 1: Bust Facing Left (1807-1812)
    • Type 2: Larger Diameter (1813-1829)
    • Type 3: Reduced Diameter (1829-1834)
  • Classic Head (1834-1838)
  • Liberty Head (1839-1908)
    • Type 1: No Motto Above Eagle on Reverse (1839-1866)
    • Type 2: Motto Above Eagle on Reverse (1866-1908)
  • Indian Head (1908-1929)

$10 Gold Eagles

  • Turban Head (1795-1804)
    • Type 1: Small Eagle on Reverse (1795-1797)
    • Type 2: Heraldic Eagle on Reverse (1797-1804)
  • Liberty Head (1838-1907)
    • Type 1: No Motto Above Eagle on Reverse (1838-1866)
    • Type 2: Motto Above Eagle on Reverse (1866-1907)
  • Indian Head (1907-1933)
    • Type 1: No Motto on Reverse (1907-1908)
    • Type 2: Motto on Reverse (1908-1933)

$20 Gold Double Eagles

  • Liberty Head (1849-1907)
    • Type 1: No Motto Above Eagle on Reverse (1849-1866)
    • Type 2: Motto Above Eagle on Reverse (1866-1907)
  • Saint-Gaudens (1907-1933)
    • Type 1: Ultra High Relief, Roman Numeral Date (1907)
    • Type 2: High Relief, No Motto, Roman Numeral Date (1907)
    • Type 3: Arabic Numeral Date, No Motto on Reverse (1907-1908)
    • Type 4: With Motto “IN GOD WE TRUST” on Reverse (1908-1933†)
  • † Only thirteen 1933 Saint-Gaudens Double Eagle coins are known to exist. The only one that is legal to own, the Farouk-Fenton Specimen, was sold in 2002 for $7.59 million at an exclusive auction. At the time of its sale, it was the most ever paid for one coin. Two coins are part of the Smithsonian’s National Numismatic Collection. Ten coins that trace their origins to Philadelphia jeweler Israel Switt are part of the “Langboard Hoard,” named for Joan Langboard, Switt’s daughter. The government seized these coins when Langboard submitted them to the Treasury Department for authentication. A civil trial filed by Langboard and her sons against the government resulted in the coins being awarded to the government in July 2011. The appeal of the decision (request of writ of certiorari) was denied hearing by the Supreme Court. The U.S. Mint reports that the coins are being stored in the United State Bullion Depository at Fort Knox, Kentucky.

Early United States Commemorative Coins

The Early or Classic Commemorative Coin era started as a way to commemorate the Columbian Exposition and raise money to fund the two-year fair. Even though this commemorative program was greeted with mixed reviews and was not a sellout, congress began to use the fundraising aspect of the commemorative programs to curry political favor with constituents. Many of these programs did not sell out which lead to the cancellation of commemorative coin programs in 1954.

There are some who consider the 1848 $2½ gold coin that was counterstamped with “CAL” on the reverse to be the first commemorative. These coins marked to show that they were made of California gold. However, if we go by the definition that commemorative coins are not circulating coins, then the $2½ CAL gold coin would not qualify as a commemorative. Coins listed in this section are those struck for commemoration and not circulation—even though some of the Columbian Exposition Half Dollars did end up in circulation.

Quarter Dollar Silver Early U.S. Commemorative Coins

  • Columbian Exposition (1893)

Half Dollar Silver Early U.S. Commemorative Coins

  • Columbian Exposition (1892-1893)
  • Panama-Pacific Exposition (1915)
  • Lincoln/Illinois Centennial (1918)
  • Maine Centennial (1920)
  • Pilgrim Tercentenary (1920-1921)
  • Missouri Centennial (1921)
  • Alabama Centennial (1921)
  • Grant Memorial (1922)
  • Monroe Doctrine Centennial (1923)
  • Huguenot-Walloon Tercentenary (1924)
  • Lexington and Concord Sesquicentennial (1925)
  • Stone Mountain Memorial (1925)
  • California Diamond Jubilee (1925)
  • Fort Vancouver Centennial (1925)
  • Sesquicentennial of American Independence (1926)
  • Oregon Trail Memorial (1926-1939)
  • Vermont Sesquicentennial (1927)
  • Hawaiian Sesquicentennial (1928)
  • Maryland Tercentenary (1934)
  • Texas Centennial (1934-1938)
  • Daniel Boone Bicentennial (1934-1938)
  • Connecticut Tercentenary (1935)
  • Arkansas Centennial (1935-1939)
  • Arkansas-Joseph T. Robinson (1936)
  • Hudson, New York Sesquicentennial (1935)
  • San Diego, California Pacific Exposition (1935-1936)
  • Old Spanish Trail (1935)
  • Rhode Island Tercentenary (1936)
  • Cleveland/Great Lakes Exposition (1936)
  • Wisconsin Territorial Centennial (1936)
  • Cincinnati Music Center (1936)
  • Long Island Tercentenary (1936)
  • York County, Maine Tercentenary (1936)
  • Bridgeport, Connecticut Centennial (1936)
  • Lynchburg, Virginia Sesquicentennial (1936)
  • Elgin Centennial (1936)
  • Albany, New York Charter (1936)
  • San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge (1936)
  • Columbia, South Carolina Sesquicentennial (1936)
  • Delaware Tercentenary (1936)
  • Battle of Gettysburg (1936)
  • Norfolk, Virginia Bicentennial (1936)
  • Roanoke Island, North Carolina (1937)
  • Battle of Antietam (1937)
  • New Rochelle, New York (1938)
  • Iowa Centennial (1946)
  • Booker T. Washington Memorial (1946-1951)
  • George Washington Carver/Booker T. Washington (1951-1954)

$1 Silver Early U.S. Commemorative Coins

  • Lafayette (1900)

$1 Gold Early U.S. Commemorative Coins

  • Louisiana Purchase Exposition (1903)
    1. Jefferson Obverse
    2. McKinley Reverse
  • Lewis and Clark Exposition (1904-1905)
  • Panama-Pacific Exposition (1915)
  • Grant Memorial (1922)
  • McKinley Memorial (1916-1917)

$2½ Dollars Gold Early U.S. Commemorative Coins

  • Panama-Pacific Exposition (1915)
  • Sesquicentennial of the United States (1926)

$50 Gold Early U.S. Commemorative Coins

  • Panama-Pacific Exposition (Round) (1915)
  • Panama-Pacific Exposition (Octagonal) (1915)

Modern United States Commemorative Coins

The Modern Commemorative Coin programs began in 1982 with the commemorative honoring George Washington’s 250th birthday. One of the conditions to restarting the commemorative coin program was to limit the number to two commemorative coins per year. However, congress found ways around the law introducing variations on a single commemorative theme.

For the Modern Commemorative Coin programs, half dollars are usually clad coins, dollars are made of 90-percent silver, and higher denominations are made of 90-percent gold. Coins were also offered in both uncirculated and proof strikes.

The U.S. Mint has produced many sets using commemorative coins including Prestige Proof and “Coins and Chronicles” sets. Your favorite coin guide will have a list of the sets produced by the U.S. Mint.

1982 Modern U.S. Commemorative Coins

  • George Washington’s 250th Birthday Half Dollar

1983 Modern U.S. Commemorative Coins

  • 1984 Summer Olympics Silver Dollar

1984 Modern U.S. Commemorative Coins

  • 1984 Summer Olympics Silver Dollar
  • 1984 Summer Olympics Gold $10

1986 Modern U.S. Commemorative Coins

  • Statue of Liberty Half Dollar
  • Statue of Liberty Silver Dollar
  • Statue of Liberty Gold $5

1987 Modern U.S. Commemorative Coins

  • United States Constitution Silver Dollar
  • United States Constitution Gold $5

1988 Modern U.S. Commemorative Coins

  • 1988 Summer Olympics Silver Dollar
  • 1988 Summer Olympics Gold $5

1989 Modern U.S. Commemorative Coins

  • U.S. Congress Bicentennial Half Dollar
  • U.S. Congress Bicentennial Silver Dollar
  • U.S. Congress Bicentennial Gold $5

1990 Modern U.S. Commemorative Coins

  • Dwight D. Eisenhower’s 100th birthday Silver Dollar

1991 Modern U.S. Commemorative Coins

  • Mount Rushmore Anniversary Half Dollar
  • Mount Rushmore Anniversary Silver Dollar
  • Mount Rushmore Anniversary Gold $5
  • Korean War Silver Dollar
  • USO 50th Anniversary Silver Dollar

1992 Modern U.S. Commemorative Coins

  • 1992 Summer Olympics Gymnast Half Dollar
  • 1992 Summer Olympics Pitcher Silver Dollar
  • 1992 Summer Olympics Sprinter Gold $5
  • White House 200th Anniversary Silver Dollar
  • Christopher Columbus Quincentenary Half Dollar
  • Christopher Columbus Quincentenary Silver Dollar
  • Christopher Columbus Quincentenary Gold $5

1993 Modern U.S. Commemorative Coins

  • Bill of Rights Half Dollar
  • Bill of Rights Silver Dollar
  • Bill of Rights Gold $5
  • World War II 50th Anniversary Half Dollar
  • World War II 50th Anniversary Silver Dollar
  • World War II 50th Anniversary Gold $5
  • Thomas Jefferson 250th Birthday Silver Dollar

1994 Modern U.S. Commemorative Coins

  • World Cup Half Dollar
  • World Cup Silver Dollar
  • World Cup Gold $5
  • Vietnam War Memorial Silver Dollar
  • U.S. Prisoners of War Silver Dollar
  • Women in Military Service for America Silver Dollar
  • Bicentennial of the U.S. Capitol Silver Dollar

1995 Modern U.S. Commemorative Coins

  • Civil War Battlefields Silver Dollar
  • Civil War Battlefields Gold $5
  • Centennial Olympics Half Dollar (Men’s Basketball)
  • Centennial Olympics Silver Dollar (Blind-tethered Runner)
  • Centennial Olympics Silver Dollar (Men’s Gymnastics)
  • Centennial Olympics Silver Dollar (Men’s Cycling)
  • Centennial Olympics Silver Dollar (Men’s Track and Field)
  • Centennial Olympics Gold $5 (Runner carrying torch)
  • Centennial Olympics Gold $5 (Olympic Stadium)
  • Special Olympics World Games Silver Dollar

1996 Modern U.S. Commemorative Coins

  • Centennial Olympics Half Dollar (Men’s Swimming)
  • Centennial Olympics Half Dollar (Women’s Soccer)
  • Centennial Olympics Silver Dollar (Wheelchair Track and Field)
  • Centennial Olympics Silver Dollar (Women’s Tennis)
  • Centennial Olympics Silver Dollar (Men’s Rowing)
  • Centennial Olympics Silver Dollar (Men’s High Jump)
  • Centennial Olympics Gold $5 (Lighting Olympic Flame)
  • Centennial Olympics Gold $5 (Opening Ceremonies)
  • National Community Service Silver Dollar
  • Smithsonian 150th Anniversary Silver Dollar
  • Smithsonian 150th Anniversary Gold $5

1997 Modern U.S. Commemorative Coins

  • U.S. Botanic Garden Silver Dollar
  • Jackie Robinson Silver Dollar
  • Jackie Robinson Gold $5
  • Law Enforcement Memorial Silver Dollar
  • Franklin Delano Roosevelt Gold $5

1998 Modern U.S. Commemorative Coins

  • Robert F. Kennedy Silver Dollar
  • Black Revolutionary War Patriots Silver Dollar

1999 Modern U.S. Commemorative Coins

  • First Lady Dolley Madison Silver Dollar
  • Yellowstone National Park Silver Dollar
  • George Washington Gold $5

2000 Modern U.S. Commemorative Coins

  • Leif Ericson Silver Dollar
  • Leif Ericson Silver 1000 Krónur, minted for Iceland
  • Library of Congress Silver Dollar
  • Library of Congress Gold $10

2001 Modern U.S. Commemorative Coins

  • American Buffalo Dollar Silver Dollar
  • U.S. Capitol Visitor Center Half Dollar
  • U.S. Capitol Visitor Center Silver Dollar
  • U.S. Capitol Visitor Center Gold $5

2002 Modern U.S. Commemorative Coins

  • Olympic Winter Games Silver Dollar
  • Olympic Winter Games Gold $5
  • West Point Bicentennial Silver Dollar

2003 Modern U.S. Commemorative Coins

  • First Flight Centennial Half Dollar
  • First Flight Centennial Silver Dollar
  • First Flight Centennial Gold $10

2004 Modern U.S. Commemorative Coins

  • Lewis & Clark Bicentennial Silver Dollar
  • Thomas Alva Edison Silver Dollar

2005 Modern U.S. Commemorative Coins

  • Chief Justice John Marshall Silver Dollar
  • Marine Corps 230th anniversary Silver Dollar

2006 Modern U.S. Commemorative Coins

  • Benjamin Franklin “Scientist” Silver Dollar
  • Benjamin Franklin “Founding Father” Silver Dollar
  • San Francisco Old Mint Silver Dollar
  • San Francisco Old Mint Gold $5

2007 Modern U.S. Commemorative Coins

  • Little Rock Nine Silver Dollar
  • Jamestown 400th Anniversary Silver Dollar
  • Jamestown 400th Anniversary Gold $5

2008 Modern U.S. Commemorative Coins

  • Bald Eagle Half Dollar
  • Bald Eagle in flight Silver Dollar Bald Eagle
  • Bald Eagle Gold $5

2009 Modern U.S. Commemorative Coins

  • Abraham Lincoln Silver Dollar
  • Louis Braille Silver Dollar

2010 Modern U.S. Commemorative Coins

  • Disabled American veterans Silver Dollar
  • Boy Scouts of America Silver Dollar

2011 Modern U.S. Commemorative Coins

  • United States Army Half Dollar
  • United States Army Silver Dollar
  • United States Army Gold $5
  • Medal of Honor Silver Dollar
  • Medal of Honor Gold $5

2012 Modern U.S. Commemorative Coins

  • United States Army Infantry and National Infantry Museum Silver Dollar
  • Star-Spangled Banner Silver Dollar
  • Star-Spangled Banner Gold $5

2013 Modern U.S. Commemorative Coins

  • Girl Scouts of the United States of America Centennial Silver Dollar
  • United States Army 5-Star Generals Clad Half Dollar
  • United States Army 5-Star Generals Silver Dollar
  • United States Army 5-Star Generals Gold $5

2014 Modern U.S. Commemorative Coins

  • Civil Rights Act of 1964 Silver Dollar
  • National Baseball Hall of Fame Clad Half Dollar
  • National Baseball Hall of Fame Silver Dollar
  • National Baseball Hall of Fame Gold $5

2015 Modern U.S. Commemorative Coins

  • United States Marshals Service 225th Anniversary Clad Half Dollar
  • United States Marshals Service 225th Anniversary Silver Dollar
  • United States Marshals Service 225th Anniversary Gold $5
  • March of Dimes Commemorative Silver Dollar

2016 Modern U.S. Commemorative Coins

  • Mark Twain Commemorative Silver Dollar
  • Mark Twain Commemorative Gold $5
  • National Park Service Centennial Clad Half Dollar
  • National Park Service Centennial Silver Dollar
  • National Park Service Centennial Gold $5

2017 Modern U.S. Commemorative Coins

  • Lions Clubs International Century of Service Silver Dollar
  • Boys Town Centennial Commemorative Clad Half Dollar
  • Boys Town Centennial Commemorative Silver Dollar
  • Boys Town Centennial Commemorative Gold $5

2018 Modern U.S. Commemorative Coins

  • World War I American Veterans Centennial Silver Dollar
  • Breast Cancer Awareness Commemorative Clad Half Dollar
  • Breast Cancer Awareness Commemorative Silver Dollar
  • Breast Cancer Awareness Commemorative “Pink” Gold $5

2019 Modern U.S. Commemorative Coin

  • Apollo 11 50th Anniversary Commemorative Gold $5
  • Apollo 11 50th Anniversary Commemorative Silver Dollar
  • Apollo 11 50th Anniversary Commemorative Clad Half Dollar
  • American Legion 100th Anniversary Gold $5
  • American Legion 100th Anniversary Silver Dollar
  • American Legion 100th Anniversary Clad Half Dollar

American Eagle Bullion Coins

The American Eagle Bullion Coins started in 1986 with the issuance of silver and gold coins to promote precious metal ownership. Congress authorized the program as pressure mounted from investors looking for an alternative to foreign bullion coins that were either banned from ownership (such as the Krugerrand) or whose import was expensive because of tariffs. American Eagle bullion coins have outsold every other nation’s bullion issues.

Bullion coins do not bear a mintmark. The U.S. Mint reports they are usually struck at the branch mints in Philadelphia, West Point, and San Francisco.

American Silver Eagle Coins

  • All American Silver Eagle coins weigh one troy ounce and contain .999 silver.
  • Business (bullion) Strikes have been issued since 1986
  • Proof (1986-2008, 2010-present); proof coins were not struck in 2009 because of a shortage of blanks
  • Collectible, uncirculated coins with a burnished (satin) finish were struck 2006-2008 at West Point.
  • Special Issues:
    • 1995-W 10th Anniversary Proof (part of a special silver proof set)
    • 2006 20th Anniversary Set (uncirculated, proof, reverse proof)
    • 2006 20th Anniversary Gold and Silver Proof Set
    • 2011 25th Anniversary Set (bullion, W proof & uncirculated, P reverse proof, S uncirculated)
    • 2012 American Eagle San Francisco Two-Coin Silver Proof Set (proof & reverse proof).
    • 2013 American Eagle West Point Two-Coin Silver Set (reverse proof and enhanced uncirculated)

American Gold Eagle Coins

American Gold Eagles are struck with in 22 karat gold whose composition are .9167 gold, .0300 silver, and .0533 copper. Coin sizes and values are based on their gold weight in troy ounces. Since the gold market trades in troy ounces, this makes it easy to calculate the value of gold in the coin. Weights and denominations are as follows:

  • 1 troy ounce: $50 face value
  • ½ troy ounce: $25 face value
  • ¼ troy ounce: $10 face value
  • One-tenth troy ounce: $5 face value
  • All four denominations have been offered as bullion versions since the series was launched in 1986.
  • 1986 Proof coins were only available in the 1-ounce size.
  • 1987 Proof coins were available in ½ and 1 ounce sizes.
  • Starting in 1988, proof coins were made available in all four sizes.
  • Collectible, uncirculated coins with a burnished (satin) finish were struck 2006-2008 at West Point in all four weights.
  • Special Issues:
    • 2006 20th Anniversary Set (Uncirculated, Proof, and Reverse Proof)
    • 2006 20th Anniversary Gold and Silver Proof Set

American Platinum Eagle Coins

Platinum Eagles made their debut in 1997 and are made of .9995 platinum. Coin sizes and values are based on their platinum weight in troy ounces. Weights and denominations are as follows:

  • 1 troy ounce: $100 face value
  • ½ troy ounce: $50 face value
  • ¼ troy ounce: $25 face value
  • One-tenth troy ounce: $10 face value
  • Business (bullion) strikes have been issued from 1997 through 2008
  • Proof coins have been issued in all weights 1997-2008 and only in one-ounce coins since 2009
  • Collectible, uncirculated coins with a burnished (satin) finish were struck 2006-2008 at West Point in all four weights.
  • A reverse design was designed in 1997 and used on the bullion coin ever since.
  • Reverse design for the proof coin had undergone rotating designs.
  • Vistas of Liberty Reverse Designs (1998-2003):
    • 1998 Eagle Over New England
    • 1999 Eagle Above Southeastern Wetlands
    • 2000 Eagle Above America’s Heartland
    • 2001 Eagle Above America’s Southwest
    • 2002 Eagle Fishing in America’s Northwest
    • 2003 Eagle Perched on Rocky Mountain Pine Branch
  • 2004 Proof reverse design: Daniel Chester French’s “America” that sits before the U.S. Customs House in New York City.
  • 2005 Proof reverse Design: Heraldic Eagle
  • 2007-W 10th Anniversary Platinum Eagle Set included a half-ounce proof and reverse proof platinum coins.
  • Branches of Government Series:
    • 2006 “Legislative Muse” representing Legislative Branch
    • 2007 American Bald Eagle representing Executive Branch
    • 2008 “Lady Justice” representing Judicial Branch
  • Preamble Series (2009–2014):
    • 2009 “To Form a More Perfect Union”
    • 2010 “To Establish Justice”
    • 2011 “To Insure Domestic Tranquility”
    • 2012 “To Provide for the Common Defence”
    • 2013 “To Promote the General Welfare”
    • 2014 “To Secure the Blessings of Liberty to Ourselves and our Posterity”
  • Nations Core Values (2015-2016)
    • 2015 “Liberty Nurtures Freedom”
    • 2016 “Liberty and Freedom”
  • 2018-2020 Preamble to the Declaration of Independence Platinum Proof Coin Series
    New obverse designs that will change yearly and a new common reverse design
    • 2018 “Life”
    • 2019 “Liberty”
    • 2020 “Pursuit of Happiness”

American Buffalo 24-Karat Gold Coins

The American Buffalo Gold Coin made its debut in 2006 and features the James Earle Fraser’s Indian Head “Buffalo” design that was used for the 1913 Type 1 nickel. Even though the design is more faithful to Fraser’s original than the 2001 American Buffalo Commemorative Dollar, there are differences: the fields are textured rather than flat; mintmarks appear on the obverse under the Indian’s headdress feather; denomination is depicted in numbers rather than spelled out on the reverse and “1 OZ. .9999 FINE GOLD” appears below the denomination; the motto “E PLURIBUS UNUM” was added to the top-right of the buffalo on the reverse; and the motto “IN GOD WE TRUST” was added to the bottom-left of the buffalo on the reverse.

  • One-ounce business (bullion) strikes have been issued every year since 2006
  • One-ounce proof coins struck at West Point have been issued every year since 2006
  • Fractional proof coins struck at West Point and were offered only in 2008. Weights and denominations are similar to American Gold Eagles.
  • Collectible, uncirculated coins with a burnished (satin) finish were struck only in 2008 at West Point.
  • In 2013, the U.S. Mint celebrated the 100th anniversary of James Earle Fraser’s design by issuing a one-ounce reverse proof coin in a special case.

First Spouse Gold Bullion Coins

First Spouse Gold Bullion coins were authorized as part of the Presidential $1 Coin Act [PDF]. Gold coins bearing the image of the first spouse of the corresponding president with historical information about the spouse on the reverse are issued for each spouse. For the cases where the president was widowed prior to taking office, the obverse of a contemporary coin was used and a historical image is used on the reverse. First Spouse Coins contain ½ ounce 24-karat gold with a $10 face value. The U.S. Mint issues gold-colored medals of the images for the average collector.

NOTE:
First Spouse must be deceased for prior to appearing on a gold coin. The program ends with the last consecutive deceased Spouse as long as there is a corresponding Presidential Dollar. The program ende with Nancy Reagan bypassing Rosalynn Carter since she and Jimmy were still alive in 2016.
2007:
Martha Washington, Abigail Adams, Thomas Jefferson’s Liberty,† Dolley Madison
2008:
Elizabeth Monroe, Louisa Adams, Andrew Jackson’s Liberty,† Martin Van Buren’s Liberty†
2009:
Anna Harrison, Letitia Tyler,‡ Julia Tyler,†† Sarah Polk, Margaret Taylor
2010:
Abigail Fillmore, Jane Pierce, James Buchanan’s Liberty,* Mary Lincoln
2011:
Eliza Johnson, Julia Grant, Lucy Hayes, Lucretia Garfield
2012:
Alice Paul,¶ Frances Cleveland (first term), Caroline Harrison,‡ Frances Cleveland (second term)
2013:
Ida McKinley, Edith Roosevelt, Helen Taft, Ellen Wilson,‡ Edith Wilson††
2014:
Florence Harding, Grace Coolidge, Lou Hoover, Anna Eleanor Roosevelt
2015:
Elizabeth Truman, Mamie Eisenhower, Jacqueline Kennedy, Claudia Taylor “Lady Bird” Johnson
2016:
Patricia Ryan “Pat” Nixon, Betty Ford, Nancy Reagan
Footnotes:

  • † President was widowed prior to inauguration
  • ‡ First Spouse died during the president’s term
  • †† Married the president during the president’s term
  • * James Buchanan was the only bachelor president
  • ¶ President Chester Arthur was widowed prior to his inauguration. However, the authorizing law gives the coin honor to Alice Paul, a suffragette who was born during Arthur’s administration.

America the Beautiful Silver Bullion Coins

The America the Beautiful Silver Bullion Coins are investor grade bullion coins whose designs are enlarged versions of their circulating counterparts including the “Quarter Dollar” denomination. Each coin contains five troy ounces of silver making them the largest coins ever issued by the U.S. Mint. These coins have been issued on the same schedule as the American the Beautiful Quarters. The U.S. Mint distributes these coins through their network of authorized bullion dealers.

A limited edition collector version is produced with a matte finish. It includes the “P” mintmark for the branch mint in Philadelphia. The coin is encapsulated in plastic, accompanied by a presentation case and Certificate of Authenticity. These coins can be purchased directly from the U.S. Mint.

24-Karat Gold Special Issue Coins

According to the law that authorized the American Buffalo 24-Karat Gold Coin program, the U.S. Mint was required to us issue one troy ounce 24-karat gold coins with James Earle Fraser’s Type 1 Buffalo Nickel design in 2006. The law requires that the Secretary have new designs reviewed by Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee and the Commission of Fine Arts prior to use. Using this loophole in the law, the U.S. Mint has created 24-karat gold special issue coins for collectors.

2009 Saint-Gaudens Ultra High Relief Gold Coin

This coin was a modern version of the 1907 pattern coin featuring the design of August Saint-Gaudens, designer of the last $20 Double Eagle coin. The coin dated MMIX (2009), was 4 millimeters thick and contained one troy ounce of .999 gold. All coins are considered business (uncirculated) strikes and were made in West Point. Sold in a special mahogany box, the only difference between the original 1907 pattern and the 2009 coin is the addition of the motto, “IN GOD WE TRUST” over the sun on the reverse, similar to that used in the Type 4 Double Eagle coin.

2014 Kennedy Half Dollar 50th Anniversary Gold Coin

Celebrating the 50th anniversary since the first Kennedy half a dollar was issued, the U.S. Mint issued a 1 troy ounce gold coin. The proof gold coin used the same design as the current business strike versions, including the denomination, but had the dual date “1964-2014.” Coins were sold in a special wooden display box with a Certificate of Authenticity.

2015 American Liberty High Relief Gold Coin

Conceptualized by the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee, it was an attempt to produce a modernized depiction of Liberty on United States coins. The U.S. Mint tapped the talents of the artists in the Artistic Infusion Program for the design. Coins were sold encapsulated and packaged in a black, satin-lined, velvet presentation case with a Certificate of Authenticity.

2016 Centennial Gold Coins

In 1916, the U.S. Mint first issued three iconic coin designs that remain favorites amongst collectors. To celebrate, the U.S. Mint issued 24-karat gold centennial versions of the Mercury dime, Standing Liberty Quarter, and Walking Liberty half-dollar. The design of the coins was the same as their century-old counterparts except the gold specification was be added. The coins were minted in size and weight to somewhat match their original silver mintage. These coins were issued with the following specifications:

  • One-tenth ounce 2016 Mercury dime
  • One-quarter ounce 2016 Standing Liberty quarter
  • Half ounce 2016 Walking Liberty half-dollar

All coins were struck in West Point and include the “W” mintmark.

2017 American Liberty 225th Anniversary Gold Coin

In celebration of the 225th Anniversary of the passage of the First Coinage Act of 1792 and the formation of the U.S. Mint, will issue a newly designed image portraying Liberty as an African-American woman wearing a crown of stars. The reverse design depicts a bold and powerful eagle in flight. It has a face value of $100.00.

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