Weekly Numismatic World News for September 17, 2017

My booth at DC Big Flea after setup. At least half of what you see was sold on 9/16!

As this is being posted I am packing up after working this past weekend at the DC Big Flea Market and Antique Show in Chantilly, Virginia. Since I have been working in the collectibles business, I have been trying to sell at one show a month with DC Big Flea being the show I work every other month. Aside from this show is close to home, I think I have found the right mix of items to be successful.

Working shows in the collectibles and antiques market is no different from a numismatic dealer on the bourse floor. Each dealer specializes in an area and tries to find the right mix of inventory and prices to make the show a success.

Although this sounds like common business sense, there are times when I go to shows and ask the dealers how they are doing I get grumbles from many and smiles from the rest. What I am guessing is that the grumblers have not adapted to the market trends.

I learned that turning over my inventory, regardless of the cost, is very important. Having stale inventory means that my money is tied up in that inventory and does not do me any good invested in that inventory. I have to find fresh items and make sure that those who are regulars and those who want to be regulars know that the next time they see me that I will have something new, even if it is in the category of merchandise I sell.

There are two lessons I have learned in the last few years. First, it is not going to hurt my bottom line if a customer asks for an additional discount such as another $5 or 10-percent off. It makes them feel like they found a bargain and I move the inventory. But that lesson is not possible without my second lesson is to treat the entire inventory as a single unit. By treating the inventory as a single unit, if I sell something at full price to someone who does not want to negotiate but sell the next item for a deeper discount, I am no better off than I thought I would have been.

With some exceptions, I think that many numismatic dealers get stuck with the idea, “this is what I paid so I have the get this price to at least break even.” If I worked that way my truck would come home loaded with inventory and more work to do. However, with the inventory sold, I now have the money to find something fresh for the next show.

Just something for the dealers to think about.

Now for this week’s news:

 September 11, 2017

The value of modern currency comes not from what it's made of, but what we all agree it's worth. → Read more at bbc.com


 September 11, 2017

The notion of money has been an important part of the human way of life for more than 2,900 years. When looking back at its origins, there is no doubt that the trade system has evolved considerably. As we mentioned before, bartering was used as the main system for the exchange of all kinds of goods and products. → Read more at thecostaricanews.com


 September 11, 2017

If anyone should not be on money, it’s Andrew Jackson. The 7th President of the United States hated paper money. He also hated Native Americans and loved having slaves, but for now, let’s focus on how he believed that the United States should only have gold and silver coins as currency. → Read more at harpersbazaar.com


 September 12, 2017

Ever throw in your two cents? Probably not like a visitor did recently at the Peoria County Courthouse. At the security checkpoint Aug. 31, someone left → Read more at pjstar.com


 September 12, 2017

In February of 1870, a sparkling new steam-powered coin press inside the United States Mint in Carson City struck its first coin, a Seated Liberty silver dollar with a crisp → Read more at elkodaily.com


 September 12, 2017

From Viking silver to Roman bronze, amateur treasure hunters in Europe locate all kinds of buried treasures with their metal detectors. Now, a new hoard is making headlines: As the ChronicleLive reports, the caretaker of a primary school in Northumberland, England used his own electronic device to find a stash of Medieval-era silver coins buried underneath the school's playground. → Read more at mentalfloss.com


 September 12, 2017

My friend Hugo Salinas Price, a tireless promoter of sound money, offers a Primer on the Mexican ‘Libertad’ Silver Ounce as a Vehicle for Savings of the Common Folk. This is a guest post by Hugo Salinas Price. → Read more at fxstreet.com


 September 13, 2017

India issued its first commemorative coin series back in 1964 in the honour of India’s first prime minister Jawaharlal Nehru. It was the same year of Nehru’s passing away. Over the last 53 years, commemorative coins have been issued for various reasons — some as uncirculated collectors items and others for mass circulation. → Read more at indianexpress.com


 September 14, 2017

One-cent coins as well as 10-cent and 25-cent coins will soon no longer be legal tender in Jamaica. (Photo: Jamaica Gleaner) → Read more at caribbean360.com


 September 16, 2017

The Big Maple Leaf was named the largest coin in the world by the Guinness World Records in 2007. But a group of thieves ensured its life in the public spotlight would be brief. → Read more at thedailybeast.com

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OIG Probe into Mnuchin using government resources expands

Secretary of the Treasury Steven T. Mnuchin seems to think his position with the government affords him perquisites to be paid by the taxpayers.

Last June, Mnuchin married actress Louise Linton at the Andrew W. Mellon Auditorium located near the National Mall. Vice President Pence officiated the ceremony.

Louise Linton and Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin are pictured during their honeymoon in Edinburgh, Scotland, Aug. 5, 2017. (Alan Simpson Photography/Splash News)

While that was old news, ABC News recently reported that Mnuchin had requested the use of a government plan to fly them on their honeymoon. They had planned a trip to Italy, France, and Scotland. Linton is a native of Scotland.

According to ABC News, an Air Force spokesperson said that a U.S. Air Force jet could cost roughly $25,000 per hour for an international flight. Domestic travel is estimated between $10,000 and $15,000 per hour.

A request for the jet was requested in writing by the Secretary’s office but later deemed unnecessary following a review by Treasury Department officials.

The Department of Treasury Office of the Inspector General (OIG) has acknowledged to ABC that it has opened an official inquiry into this request. This investigation is in addition to the investigation the OIG is making into his trip to Kentucky.

The Treasury Department is also being sued by a public interest research group because the department has not responded to their Freedom of Information Act request.

Mnuchin becomes the first Treasury Secretary since Andrew W. Mellon to be actively investigated for wrongdoing while serving as Secretary.

For reference, articles of impeachment were introduced in the House of Representatives to remove Mellon from office in January 1932. Hearings were held in the House Judiciary Committee. Before the committee voted on the articles of impeachment, Mellon was appointed as the Ambassador to the Court of St. James (the formal name of the Ambassador to the United Kingdom). He resigned as Treasury Secretary and served as an ambassador for a year before retiring to private life.

Mnuchin has not commented on the situation.

Image courtesy of Alan Simpson Photography/Splash News via ABC News.

Treasury Sued for Mnuchin Travel Records

Louise Linton’s Instagram post that prompted the initial inquiry by the watchdog group.

Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (CREW) filed a law suit against the Department of the Treasury for the release of documents relating to the August 21 trip by Secretary Steven Mnuchin and his wife Louise Linton.

On August 23, CREW filed a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request to obtain department records of the trip. They said that Treasury has not responded.

“We filed an expedited FOIA request because Americans deserve more information to determine whether there has been misuse of government resources,” CREW Executive Director Noah Bookbinder said. “We’re suing because the government has so far failed even to respond.”

A report has noted that a Treasury spokesperson confirmed that Mnuchin reimbursed the government for Linton’s travel expenses

Copy of the pleadings (courtesy of CREW):
CREW v Treasury

Weekly Numismatic World News for September 10, 2017 (TRY 2)

NOTE: A previous version was posted by mistake and then deleted. Sorry!

The old Round Pound and the new 12-sided £1 coin

As I watch the numismatic-related news that is published around the world in the regular media are the number of stories that come out of the United Kingdom and India.

Aside from the change over from the “round pound” to the new 12-sided pound coin most of the stories are about what to look for in pocket change. People in the UK are now scrutinizing their pocket change more with the issuance of the new pound coin and it has caused a lot of people to look for the circulating commemoratives issued by the Royal Mint.

Unlike the United States, the primary unit of currency in the UK, the pound, circulates as a coin since the lowest denomination of paper currency is the £5 banknote.

The Royal Mint also produces a £2 coin.

Additionally, the 50 pence coin does circulate and has also been used for commemorative purposes.

Now that the focus is on the new 12-sided pound coin, the other coins have been getting notice. The nation’s tabloids have been writing about these coins generating more interest than the America the Beautiful quarters are receiving here in the United States.

S. John Rajendra Prasad with his collection of ancient coins and rare stamps. (Credit: The Hindu)

India is a different story. I have not seen any other society that has a general love of coins. There are stories about collectors who look for coins in various places, hoard coins, and use coins for teaching and trading.

The stories that appear in the press the collectors that are highlighted for the volume and longevity of their collections.

Volume seems to be a similar story between the collections. Many of these collections would be classified as hoards based on our societal norms. But rather than lumping the coins together, Indian collectors do sort and separate coins by types, sometimes in a way that makes sense.

I have not had the chance to learn more about the appeal of coins to the Indian society but I find the overall passion for their collecting pursuits quite appealing.

And now the news…

 September 4, 2017

THE Benjamin Bunny 50p coin has now arrived and is the latest commemorative coin to be released by the Royal Mint as part of the Beatrix Potter series. But when exactly did the coin enter circulati… → Read more at thesun.co.uk


 September 7, 2017

‘Find a penny, pick it up. All day long, you’ll have good luck’ – that’s how the saying goes but what if it was worth enough to keep you going for months? A dad has told of his surprise after being handed a rare 1p coin that could be worth thousands of pounds – because it’s in silver. → Read more at mirror.co.uk


 September 9, 2017

A hoard of more than 280 gold and silver coins from the time of the Roman invasion of 
Britain has been unearthed by two metal detectorists. → Read more at granthamjournal.co.uk


 September 9, 2017

The first building block of Australia’s new icebreaker was welded into place at a keel laying ceremony at Damen Shipyard Galati in Romania late last month. The concept design was done by Knud E. Hansen, and Managing Director, Finn Wollesen attended the ceremony, along with Rasmus Nygaard from Friends of Nella Dan. → Read more at maritime-executive.com

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Mnuchin under investigation for Fort Knox trip

Being Secretary of the Treasury does have its perks.

On August 21, Secretary of the Treasury Steven T. Mnuchin traveled to Louisville, Kentucky to speak at a luncheon sponsored by the Louisville chamber of commerce. Joining him on the flight was his wife, actress Louise Linton.

Later in the day, Mnuchin, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY), Rep. Brett Guthrie (R-KY), and Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin (R) visited the United States Bullion Depository at Fort Knox, Kentucky becoming the first civilians to visit the facility since 1974. The U.S. Mint posted a picture of Mnuchin holding a gold bar in front of a balance scale.

Conspiracy theorists have comment, “is that’s all that’s left?”

On August 21, 2017, was the total eclipse of the sun that stretched from Oregon to South Carolina. Although the path of the total eclipse passed over part of Kentucky, the Fort Knox area experienced only 96-percent of the eclipse.

During the trip, Linton posted a picture of her departing a government plane on Instagram noting her attire. In the context of a diva actress, this type of braggadocio is expected. But as someone flying at government expense during what is supposed to be a government-sponsored trip.

When a concerned citizen questioned her choices in the context of a government trip, Linton responded in a way that one would expect of a diva, self-centered actress. But as someone traveling using government-sponsored transportation, Linton’s comments were not well received.

A day later Linton apologized for her comments, removed the Instagram post, and made her profile private.

Days following the trip, Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (CREW) filed a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request with the Department of the Treasury asking for information about the trip. CREW is questioning the use of government resources for what they claim is a personal trip. Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR), the Ranking Member of the Senate Finance Committee, also wrote to the Treasury Department asking for records of justification for Mnuchin’s use of a government plan for the trip.

Because of the outrage about the trip, The Washington Post is reporting that the Treasury Office of the Inspector General will be looking into the trip “… to determine whether all applicable travel, ethics, and appropriation laws and policies were observed.”

Cabinet officials can request to use government flights under specific criteria. These flights are flown mainly using Air Force resources and are costlier than a commercial flight. It is recommended that cabinet officials use military resources only in the case of national security or for employees whose security could not be guaranteed in the commercial environment.

A source has suggested that Mnuchin may have violated government policy by using the government plane for this trip. Mnuchin does not face a threat that requires additional security that would justify his using government resources. Further, since Linton is not a government employee, her travel is not reimbursable by the government. It was predicted that Mnuchin will be required to pay the difference between a commercial flight and the cost of the government flight. He will also be required to reimburse the government the full cost of Linton’s portion of the trip.

Weekly Numismatic World News for September 3, 2017

For a brief history of the coin toss read this article at the Provident Metals Blog.

Labor Day was created by the labor movement in the late 19th century to celebrate the contributions that workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of the country. It became an official federal holiday in 1894 and marks the unofficial end of summer.

Aside from having a three day weekend, it is traditionally the weekend that college football begins its season. The seasons started Thursday night and will continue until the Chick-Fil-A Kickoff Classic on Monday night. Next Thursday, the NFL season begins.

Football season also means that as I search for numismatic-related news, the term “coin toss” will fill up the search results. This year there may be a twist in that there are reports that some games, networks, and conferences will be creating their own coin to toss. Some have reported that they will be selling the coins for collectors while others may auction game used coins for charity. This is an opportunity for sports fans and exonumia collectors to have some fun together.

If you are looking for the manufacture of these coins, you can visit the website for the Highland Mint. It appears that they have the contracts with all of the sports leagues to provide coin and coin-related souvenirs.

And now the news…

 August 28, 2017

Public demand has been so high the Treasury Department will mint an additional 490,000 commemorative coins to mark the cremation of His Majesty King Bhumibol Adulyadej this October. The largest portion will be 400,000 silver commemorative coins priced at 2,000 baht each, with 50,000 more gold coins priced at 50,000 baht each and 40,000 copper coins priced at 3,000 baht each, director-general Patchara Anuntasilpa said on Monday. → Read more at bangkokpost.com


 August 29, 2017

Among those captivated by the recent story of the little Israeli girl who stumbled on a 2,000-year-old half-shekel coin — only to learn some days later that what she had found was a roughly 15-year-old souvenir — was Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. → Read more at haaretz.com


 August 30, 2017

Armed with a metal detector in 2014, Jim Bailey unearthed a small, silver coin about the size of an American dime that once belonged to a pirate. MIDDLETOWN, R.I. (WJAR) — Sweet Berry Farm in Middletown covers more than 100 acres. → Read more at turnto10.com


 August 30, 2017

JERSEY CITY – The United States Mint has introduced a New Jersey-inspired coin into circulation as part of its “America the Beautiful Quarters” program. Dozens gathered at Ellis Island on Wednesday morning for the debut of the “Island of Hope” coin, which depicts a family of immigrants arriving to the United States. → Read more at nj.com


 August 30, 2017

Governments have long waged a war on cash in an attempt to curb terrorism and tax evasion. Their focus has typically been on eliminating large denominations, like Europe’s €500 bill or India’s 1,000 rupee note. → Read more at qz.com


 August 30, 2017

Police in the northwestern German city of Cologne hit an unexpected jackpot when they chanced upon historical coins and currency notes during a drug-related search. The historical loot was found in a black carry-on suitcase in May 2017, police said on Thursday. → Read more at dw.com


 September 3, 2017

Vernon economist takes a look at money → Read more at vernonmorningstar.com

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Weekly Numismatic World News for August 20, 2017

Charging Bull by Arturo DiModica is a bronze sculpture that stands in Bowling Green Park just south of the Financial District in lower Manhattan.

In my nearly 12 years of writing this blog and occasionally delving into the reasons for the fluctuating prices of precious metals and their impact on the numismatic market, there have been some fundamentals that have driven that market.

As I was reminded in one of the articles in today’s list, “Is Now The Time To Buy Gold?” predicting the price of gold is as easy as tracking the U.S. dollar and the stock markets. If the dollar weakens or the markets show insecurity, then the price of gold rises. What makes this tricky is that this is an either/or proposition that makes the theory sound easier than it is.

Simply, gold investing is used as a hedge against weakening currencies. If the currency loses its purchasing power, the price of gold rises. When stocks lose their asset values and are not providing returns to investors, currency may be strong but its buying power is not what it used to be, also known as inflation, then gold becomes a safe bet.

Silver is sometimes referred to as the “poor man’s investment” because of its lower price.

The tricky part is trying to predict what the markets are going to do. This is why when something happens that creates uncertainty, the markets react like a scared dog in a thunderstorm (one of my dogs becomes a basket case during thunderstorms).

The biggest problem is that uncertainty can come as quickly as a Tweet. It is amazing how one statement in 140-characters or less could move all of these markets. It is the business version of being scared of their own shadow.

For now, I am just going to stick to collecting coins. Aside from the satisfaction of the chase and accomplishment, my collection is worth more than what I paid. It is more fun and I know that when it is time to sell, I will make a profit.

And now the news…

 August 15, 2017

IT has been the “hardest secret” that Australian children’s book author Mem Fox has had to keep for a year. → Read more at news.com.au


 August 16, 2017

The Royal Canadian Mint has issued a new coin to celebrate a trail that runs through the heart of Saskatoon, along the South Saskatchewan River. → Read more at cbc.ca


 August 16, 2017

It’s a special promotion through one supermarket chain, so you might just end up with these magical $2 coins in your possession. → Read more at startsat60.com


 August 16, 2017

As examples of hubris go, that of Hannibal (the Carthaginian general, not the fictional serial killer) takes some matching. And now German geochemists have added solid science to the evidence of historians and archeologists. → Read more at cosmosmagazine.com


 August 16, 2017

Interesting money can you bring from journey. Disney dollars are traded one-to-one to the American, the Cuban peso is only for local residents, the coin 25 Euro in almost every country you can find unusual currency. Yes, and the usual money that we pay in the supermarkets, are often a pleasant and even beautiful reminder … → Read more at micetimes.asia


 August 18, 2017

With gold climbing to over $1,300 an ounce for the first time this year, should investors consider now the time to buy gold? Or is waiting a better option? → Read more at stockinvestor.com


 August 19, 2017

Readers who know not to take wooden nickels are instead advised to hunt for experimental pennies of the 1940s; some pay off big time. → Read more at tucson.com


 August 19, 2017

The metal detectorist said he had made some finds which were of archaeological interest but this one was "bling". → Read more at bbc.com


 August 19, 2017

Bob Harwell has turned his childhood pastime of collecting coins into a profession, and now coins he collected are on display at a University of Georgia library. The display includes a complete set… → Read more at reporternewspapers.net

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Weekly Numismatic World News for August 13, 2017

The reasons why counterfeiters are successful is that people do not pay attention. Even when people do allegedly pay attention, it is almost as if the brain is not engaging.

A report from the U.K. says that people returning from mainland Europe are trying to pass euros because they look like the new £1 coin.

Although both coins are bi-metallic, the new pound coin is 12-sided meaning that there are 12 distinct “corners” that should be able to be felt on the coin. The euro is round with a milled edge that should have a different feel.

Even though the outer ring of both coins is made of nickel-brass, the ring of the euro coin is thinner than the outer ring of the new 12-sided pound coin.

The final clue in telling the difference is that the pound coin, like all legal tender coins minted by the Royal Mint, the coin features the portrait of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II while the euro features a map of Europe and the denomination.

The cost for not paying attention is a loss of about 9 pence since one euro is worth about 91 pence.

And now this week’s news.

 August 7, 2017

Two of the rarest one cent coins ever made have sold at auction for a combined total close to half a million dollars. A 1943 Lincoln Penny fetched $282,000 while a 1792 Birch Cent which had been thought to have been lost for 130 years sold for $211,500. → Read more at dailymail.co.uk


 August 8, 2017

HOLDREGE — Robert Kinkaid of Lexington had worked to get the book “Forgotten Colorado Silver” published since 1982. His efforts paid off, and the book was published this year. One of the authors, Robert D. → Read more at kearneyhub.com


 August 8, 2017

The new £5 Prince Philip coin that has been released to celebrate his 70 years of service could be worth a fortune in the future. The coin costs £13 to pre-order through the Royal Mint and will be shipped in late August. → Read more at metro.co.uk


 August 8, 2017

UK’s Royal Mint will supply Argentina with 150 million peso coins, after the institution won a contract to assist with the minting of a new coin series. Announced on social media by UK chancellor Philip Hammond, the mint will work closely with its Argentine counterpart – Sociedad del Estado Casa de Moneda – to produce blanks for the new coin series. → Read more at en.mercopress.com


 August 11, 2017

Holidaymakers returning from Europe are trying to pass off euro coins as the new pound coins in British shops because they look so similar. Shopkeepers are warning staff to be vigilant after noticing the huge increase in one euro coins being found in takings. → Read more at metro.co.uk


 August 11, 2017

His initials are on every British coin minted since 2015, but who is the Jiu Jitsu enthusiast who designed the Queen's head, despite never having met her? He is an artist whose most famous portrait has been reproduced billions of times, and you probably have one in your pocket right now. → Read more at bbc.com


 Aug 12, 2017

This full-dimensional 3D coin weighs 100 grams and is made of pure silver and there will be 251 pieces available for sale in the Indian market. → Read more at hindustantimes.com


 Aug 13, 2017

The federal government plans to pay tribute to Georgia’s largest barrier island by issuing a special coin. → Read more at fox5atlanta.com

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Weekly Numismatic World News for August 6, 2017

I guess things went well at the American Numismatic Association World’s Fair of Money. There seems to have been a little reaction on social media and some input from the regular numismatic media, but for the most part, I am going to have to wait until my coin club meeting on Tuesday to speak with those who attended.

A recent purchase of six Canadian Tokens

My week has not been without the ability to acquire numismatic items. While rummaging through an estate sale I found some Canadian tokens. Since I own a copy of the Breton book, Illustrated History of Coins and Tokens Relating to Canada, this will give me a chance to look into the few token I was able to buy at a very inexpensive price. Who knows, maybe this will spark another collection interest!

Finally, I want to wish my brother Joel a Happy Birthday. I cannot believe the old man is 53!

July 31, 2017

As far back as he can remember, he has collected coins. As a young boy, he tagged along with his father to coin club meetings and exhibitions, gaining an interest in Canadian pennies and U.S. cents. "I don't remember not collecting," said Hallenbeck, who owns Hallenbeck Coin Gallery at 711 N. → Read more at gazette.com


July 31, 2017

OSKALOOSA — Jerry Jenkins, a former Oskaloosa resident who now lives in Texas, recently mailed two old coins to the Oskaloosa Herald. Jenkins said he wanted the coins to be donated to Nelson Pioneer Farm and Museum as part of Mahaska County history. → Read more at oskaloosa.com


July 31, 2017

BENGALURU: Investors and history lovers made a beeline this weekend for Nanyadarshini 2017. This was the first edition of the annual numismatics exhibition post-demonetisation by the Karnataka Numismatic Society at Shikshakara Bhawan on Kempegowda Road in the city. → Read more at economictimes.indiatimes.com


August 1, 2017

In 2013, David McCarthy spotted a rare coin in an auction catalog and immediately had a hunch it was the first coin minted by the fledgling United States of America in 1783. Not the first run of coins, mind you, but the very first one. → Read more at npr.org


August 1, 2017

WASHINGTON (AP) — Old inns along the Revolutionary War trails boast of George Washington sleeping there. But coin experts say they have found the first silver piece minted by the United States — one likely held by the most en vogue of Founding Fathers, Alexander Hamilton. → Read more at seattletimes.com


August 1, 2017

A picturesque stretch of land in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula is set to grace a special quarter the United States Mint unveils for 2018. The Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore is among the places featuring on the reverse side for the America the Beautiful Quarters program, officials announced Wednesday at the American Numismatics Association’s World’s Fair of Money. → Read more at detroitnews.com


August 2, 2017

The design for a coin representing Voyageurs National Park was unveiled this week along with the designs for four other national sites to be included in the United States Mint multi-year "America the Beautiful Quarters" program. → Read more at ifallsjournal.com


August 3, 2017

The Royal Mint is celebrating Prince Philip‘s retirement the same way they celebrate, well, all big royal milestones: with a new coin. The Queen‘s 96-year-old husband retired from official duties on Wednesday, after 64 years of service on behalf of the royal family. → Read more at people.com


August 3, 2017

ULAN BATOR, Aug. 3 (Xinhua) — The Central Bank of Mongolia has issued a commemorative coin dedicated to the Gobi brown bear which is on the verge of extinction. The coin made of pure silver has the shape of a circle with a diameter of 38.61 mm and a price of 300,000 togrog (122 U.S. dollars). → Read more at news.xinhuanet.com


August 3, 2017

Recently in The Hill, we heard former Reps. Jim Kolbe (R-Ariz.) and Tim Penny (D-Minn.) promote currency reforms as a way to save taxpayers money. Unfortunately, their proposed solution, The Currency Optimization, Innovation, and National Savings (COINS) Act of 2017, misses the mark completely and would move the country in exactly the wrong direction. → Read more at thehill.com

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July 2017 Numismatic Legislation Review

As part of my bill tracking, I am including the status of the Saint-Gaudens National Historical Park Redesignation Act even though it does not have numismatic content. Given the impact of Agustus Saint-Gaudens to the numismatic world, it seems fitting to watch the status of this bill. Converting it from a National Historic Site to a National Park is being done for funding reasons. Although it will continue to be operated by the National Park Service, as a National Park there will be more money available for its operations.

H.R. 965: Saint-Gaudens National Historical Park Redesignation Act
Sponsor: Rep. Ann M. Kuster (D-NH)
Introduced: February 7, 2017
This bill redesignates the Saint-Gaudens National Historic Site, in New Hampshire, as the "Saint-Gaudens National Historical Park."
Referred to the Subcommittee on Federal Lands. — Feb 23, 2017
Ordered to be Reported (Amended) by Unanimous Consent. — Jul 26, 2017
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/115-HR956.
S. 312: Saint-Gaudens National Historical Park Redesignation Act
Sponsor: Sen. Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH)
Introduced: February 6, 2017
This bill redesignates the Saint-Gaudens National Historic Site, in New Hampshire, as the "Saint-Gaudens National Historical Park."
Read twice and referred to the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. — Feb 6, 2017
Committee on Energy and Natural Resources Subcommittee on National Parks. Hearings held. — Jul 19, 2017
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/115-S312.
S. 1568: President John F. Kennedy Commemorative Coin Act
Sponsor: Sen. Edward J. Markey (D-MA)
Introduced: July 17, 2017
Read twice and referred to the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs. — Jul 17, 2017
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/115-S1568.
H.R. 3274: President John F. Kennedy Commemorative Coin Act
Sponsor: Rep. Kevin Mccarthy (R-CA)
Introduced: July 17, 2017
Referred to the House Committee on Financial Services. — Jul 17, 2017
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/115-HR3274.

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