LA28 Commemorative Coins Bills

One of several emblems as part of a changing logo to be used by LA28 Committee

Two bills were submitted in Congress (H.R. 8047 and S. 4382) to create a 2028 commemorative coin program for the LA28, the Summer Olympics and Paralympic Games hosted in Los Angeles in 2028. Both are called the LA28 Olympic and Paralympic Games Commemorative Coin Act.

If passed, the commemorative set will include a $5 gold coin, silver dollar, clad half-dollar, and a five-ounce silver proof coin that collectors call the “hockey puck.” The bill sets mintage limits are 100,000 gold coins, 500,000 silver dollars, 300,000 clad half-dollars, and 100,000 proof hockey pucks.

The 300,000 limits for the clad half-dollars are likely to be increased when the bill goes through markup.

The bill sets the surcharges at $35 for each of the $5 gold coins sold, $10 for each silver dollar, $5 for each clad half-dollar, and $50 for each hockey puck. Proceeds will be paid to the U.S. Olympic Committee.

If the program sells out, the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Committee will receive $15 million from the sale of the commemoratives.

Of course, all this will be moot if the bill does not pass Congress and is not signed by the President.

H.R. 8047: LA28 Olympic and Paralympic Games Commemorative Coin Act
Sponsor: Rep. Brad Sherman (D-CA)
Introduced: June 13, 2022
Referred to the House Committee on Financial Services. — Jun 13, 2022
Introduced in House — Jun 13, 2022
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/117-HR8047.

S. 4382: LA28 Olympic and Paralympic Games Commemorative Coin Act
Sponsor: Sen. Alex Padilla (D-CA)
Introduced: June 13, 2022
Introduced in Senate — Jun 13, 2022
Read twice and referred to the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs. — Jun 13, 2022
Read twice and referred to the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs. (Sponsor Introductory Remarks on measure: CR S2912) — Jun 13, 2022
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/117-S4382.

WWII Memorial Commemorative Coin Bill Passes Senate

World War II Memorial

World War II Memorial from the Washington Monument

Welcome to today’s edition of Congress Did Something Non-Partisan?

Without noticeable prompting or any other reason, the Senate Banking Committee discharged the Greatest Generation Memorial Act (S. 1596) and was passed by unanimous consent by the Senate.

If passed, the bill will require the minting of up to 50,000 $5 gold coins, 400,000 $1 silver coins, and 750,000 clad half-dollar coins in commemoration of the National World War II Memorial in Washington.

At the end of the sale, the Treasury will pay all surcharges ($35 per gold coin, $10 per silver dollar, and $5 per clad half-dollar) to the Friends of the National World War II Memorial to help maintain the memorial.

The Senate sent the bill to the House of Representatives, where it is being held at the desk because it was a bill not introduced by the majority party.

S. 1596: Greatest Generation Memorial Act
Sponsor: Sen. Mike Rounds (R-SD)
Introduced: May 12, 2021
Summary: This bill directs the Department of the Treasury to mint and issue up to 50,000 $5 coins, 400,000 $1 silver coins, and 750,000 half-dollar clad coins in commemoration of the National World War II Memorial in the District of Columbia. The design of the coins shall be emblematic of the memorial and the service and sacrifice of American soldiers and civilians during World War II. All surcharges received from the sale of such coins shall be paid to the Friends of the National World War II Memorial to support the National Park Service in maintaining and repairing the memorial, and for educational and commemorative programs.
Introduced in Senate — May 12, 2021
Read twice and referred to the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs. — May 12, 2021
Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs discharged by Unanimous Consent. — May 16, 2022
Passed Senate with an amendment by Unanimous Consent. (text of amendment in the nature of a substitute: CR S2515-2516) — May 16, 2022
Measure laid before Senate by unanimous consent. — May 16, 2022
Message on Senate action sent to the House. — May 17, 2022
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/117-S1596.

Numismatic Legislation Update

James Weldon Johnson

James Weldon Johnson (Photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1932)

Last month, Rep. Al Lawson (D-FL) introduced the James Weldon Johnson Commemorative Coin Act (H.R. 7496). If the bill passes, it will create a gold $5, silver dollar, and clad half-dollar program in 2024.

James Weldon Johnson was a writer and civil rights activist who was a leader of the NAACP. In 1920, Johnson was chosen as the first African-American executive secretary of the NAACP, effectively becoming its chief operating officer.

Johnson was known for his writing about black culture during the Harlem Renaissance. His work includes the lyrics for “Lift Every Voice and Sing,” which later became known as the Negro National Anthem. The music was written by his younger brother, J. Rosamond Johnson.

Johnson’s other accomplishments include his appointment as the U.S. consul in Venezuela and Nicaragua by Theodore Roosevelt, the first African-American professor hired by New York University, and later became a professor at Fisk University.

If this bill becomes law, 85-percent of the surcharges will be divided equally between the Marshall-Motley Scholars Program, the Stanton College Preparatory School, and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). The rest of the money will be given to the James Weldon Johnson Foundation.

H.R. 7469: James Weldon Johnson Commemorative Coin Act
Sponsor: Rep. Al Lawson (D-FL)
Introduced: April 7, 2022
Introduced in House — Apr 7, 2022
Referred to the House Committee on Financial Services. — Apr 7, 2022
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/117-HR7469.

OMG! Congress Did Something!

Seal of the United States CongressI have to admit that I stopped watching what they are doing on Capitol Hill. As long as the government is functioning, my neighbors continue to work as federal workers or government contractors, my days of watching Congress has passed. Although my program continues to download the status of bills in Congress daily, the overall frustration with Congress does not have me running to the computer to check the status.

While reading other news sources, I discovered that the Senate did something. Of course, the House has to be passed to have any impact, but the fact that the Senate actually did work is astounding!

S. 697: Harriet Tubman Bicentennial Commemorative Coin Act
Sponsor: Sen. Jacklyn Rosen (D-NV)
Introduced: March 11, 2021
Summary: This bill directs the Department of the Treasury to mint and issue 50,000 $5 gold coins, 400,000 $1 silver coins, and 750,000 half-dollar clad coins emblematic of the legacy of Harriet Tubman as an abolitionist. The Secretary may issue coins under this bill only during the period of January 1, 2024, through December 31, 2024. All surcharges received by Treasury from the sale of such coins must be paid equally to the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center in Cincinnati, Ohio, and The Harriet Tubman Home, Inc. in Auburn, New York, for the purpose of accomplishing and advancing their missions.
Introduced in Senate — Mar 11, 2021
Read twice and referred to the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs. — Mar 11, 2021
Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs discharged by Unanimous Consent. — Feb 17, 2022
Passed Senate without amendment by Voice Vote. — Feb 17, 2022
Passed/agreed to in Senate: Passed Senate without amendment by Voice Vote. — Feb 17, 2022
Message on Senate action sent to the House. — Feb 18, 2022
Received in the House. — Feb 18, 2022
Held at the desk. — Feb 18, 2022
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/117-S697.

On February 17, 2022, the Senate passed the Harriet Tubman Bicentennial Commemorative Coin Act (S. 697) by voice vote. There was no debate or commentary. Just a procedural voice vote to clean up non-controversial bills that are just hanging around.

If the House passes the bill, the U.S. Mint will issue gold, silver, and clad coins celebrating the legacy of Harriet Tubman. The sale proceeds will go to National Underground Railroad Freedom Center in Cincinnati, Ohio, and The Harriet Tubman Home in Auburn, New York.

H.R. 6663: Fleet Reserve Association 100th Anniversary Act
Sponsor: Rep. Gus M. Bilirakis (R-FL)
Introduced: February 9, 2022
Introduced in House — Feb 9, 2022
Referred to the House Committee on Financial Services. — Feb 9, 2022
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/117-HR6663.

In other numismatic-related Congressional news, two bills were introduced in the House of Representatives. The Fleet Reserve Association 100th Anniversary Act (H.R. 6663) may not be more than a vanity bill introduction.

H.R. 6681: 100th anniversary of the Lincoln Memorial Commemorative Coin Act
Sponsor: Rep. Darin Lahood (R-IL)
Introduced: February 9, 2022
Introduced in House — Feb 9, 2022
Referred to the House Committee on Financial Services. — Feb 9, 2022
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/117-HR6681.

The other bill is the 100th anniversary of the Lincoln Memorial Commemorative Coin Act (H.R. 6681) to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the dedication of the Lincoln Memorial. The Lincoln Memorial was dedicated on May 30, 1922. If the bill passes, the U.S. Mint can issue 500,000 silver dollars in 2023. The proceeds will be paid to the Trust of the National Mall and to restore and preserve the Lincoln Memorial.

LEGISLATIVE UPDATE: Semiquincentennial Commemorative Coin Act

On Friday, the Government Printing Office updated S. 2384, the Semiquincentennial Commemorative Coin Act, to include a summary. If passed, the bill will create a commemorative coin program in 2026 to celebrate the 250th anniversary of declaring our independence from England.

S. 2384: Semiquincentennial Commemorative Coin Act
Sponsor: Sen. Patrick J. Toomey (R-PA)
Introduced: July 20, 2021
Summary: This bill directs the Department of the Treasury to mint and issue $25.00 gold coins, $2.50 silver coins, 25 cent clad coins, and proof silver $2.50 coins in commemoration of the 250th anniversary of the establishment of the United States. The designs of the coins shall be emblematic of the semiquincentennial anniversary of the establishment of the United States of America and celebrate 250 years of our nation. On each coin there shall be

  • a designation of the value of the coin;
  • an inscription of the years 1776-2026; and
  • inscriptions of the words Liberty, In God We Trust, United States of America, and E Pluribus Unum.

Treasury may issue coins under this bill only during the period beginning on January 1, 2026, and ending on December 31, 2026. All sales of coins issued shall include a surcharge as prescribed by this bill. All surcharges received by Treasury from the sale of such coins shall be paid to the America 250 Foundation to fund the restoration, rehabilitation, and interpretation of units of the U.S. National Park System and its related areas, as a legacy of the semiquincentennial commemoration.

Introduced in Senate — Jul 20, 2021
Read twice and referred to the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs. — Jul 20, 2021
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/117-S2384.

An interesting addition to the bill is in Section 3, Paragraph d that reads:

(d) Mintage Limit Exception.—If the Secretary determines, based on independent, market based research conducted by the designated recipient organization identified in section 7(b) that the mintage levels described under this subsection are not adequate to meet public demand, the Secretary may increase the mintage levels as the Secretary determines is necessary to meet public demand.

If the America 250 Foundation finds that the mintage limits are too low, the U.S. Mint can strike more coins without asking permission. Given the current status of the U.S. Mint, it will be interesting to see how it is implemented.

October 2021 Numismatic Legislative Review

Seal of the United States CongressI have been following politics for many years. I trace my awakening to the news and politics to the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. It was something in the news that we discussed in school, and I did not know or understand what my classmates were talking about. After school, I read the stories about MLK in the Daily News and Newsday that were delivered daily. When my father came home, he brought a copy of the New York Times.

I was so interested in public policy that I did a master’s in public policy late in life. Having the degree helped my career as a government contractor working with government executives and appointees. Unlike others who go into public policy, I was fascinated with policy compliance and implementation. It became helpful in trying to implement information security policies for the government.

After 40 years in computing and 25 years with the federal government, I burned out. Since then, I have followed numismatic-related policy because the U.S. Mint does not strike any legal tender coin without a law permitting them.

Since retiring in 2017, partisan politics has gone from bad to worse. Politicians and their constituents are no longer talking with each other but shouting at each other. It is no longer looking to accomplish something for the common good but who can score points.

Unfortunately, there is no such thing as the radical middle. Those of us in the center are willing to work together but are being shut out by the shouting coming from the extremes.

Numismatic-related bills are not immune to the policy divide. The bills get dumped into committees and are subject to the partisan scorecard review. These bills languish in committee until an end-of-session floor review.

Although following numismatic legislation is necessary to know what the U.S Mint strikes next, it is no longer fun. Therefore, this will be the last monthly report. In the future, I will post updates after the Government Printing Office reports them. The GPO is the official publisher of the U.S. government and they are responsible for publishing everything from congress.

For the last monthly report, Rep. Claudia Tenney (R-NY) introduced H.R. 5601, the Erie Canal Bicentennial Commemorative Coin Act. If passed, the bill will create a commemorative program to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the building of the Erie Canal.

In 2025, the bill would require the U.S. Mint to strike clad half-dollars, silver dollars, and gold $5 coins with the dual date 2017-2025. These dates would mark the 200th anniversary of the construction of the canal (1817-1825). The funds raised from the sale of these coins would be paid to the “Erie Canalway Heritage Fund, Inc., to support the historic preservation, conservation, recreation, interpretation, tourism, and community development of the Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor and for educational and commemorative programs of the Erie Canal’s history and impact on our Nation’s history.”

H.R. 5601: Erie Canal Bicentennial Commemorative Coin Act
Sponsor: Rep. Claudia Tenney (R-NY)
Introduced: October 15, 2021
Summary: This bill directs the Department of the Treasury to mint and issue 50,000 $5 gold coins, 400,000 $1 silver coins, and 750,000 half-dollar clad coins in recognition of the bicentennial of the Erie Canal. The designs of the coins shall be emblematic of the Erie Canal and its impact on the development of the United States and New York. Treasury may issue coins minted under this bill only during the one-year period beginning on January 1, 2025. All sales of coins issued under this bill shall include a surcharge, which shall be paid to the Erie Canalway Heritage Fund, Inc., to support the historic preservation, conservation, recreation, interpretation, tourism, and community development of the Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor in New York and for educational and commemorative programs of the Erie Canal’s history and impact on our nation’s history.
Introduced in House — Oct 15, 2021
Referred to the House Committee on Financial Services. — Oct 15, 2021
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/117-HR5601.

It would not be the first time the Erie Canal appears on a coin. The Erie Canal was the innovation celebrated on the 2021 New York American Innovation $1 Coin.

Numismatic Legislation Review: Catching Up

Seal of the United States CongressIt has been a few months since I reported on the numismatic-related bills in Congress. For the last few months, there has been little to report. Members of Congress have introduced several vanity bills, but watching their actions has been frustrating.

Regardless of the side of the aisle you follow, Congress is a very frustrating body. Members live in their own world, interested in what they can do to make them look better. When a citizen is interested in something that is not prominent in the daily news cycle, the response is cold or non-existent.

In the last few months, I tried to inquire about the scheduling of hearings in the Congressional committees regarding coin legislation. There were no answers.

For the last ten years, every Congress has promised to return to regular order. It seems that what we have now is regular order, meaning that coin-related legislation will not be heard until a holiday period or during the lame-duck session in 2022.

Welcome to the new regular order.

H.R. 4429: Semiquincentennial Commemorative Coin Act
Sponsor: Rep. Bonnie Watson coleman (D-NJ)
Introduced: July 13, 2021
Summary: This bill directs the Department of the Treasury to mint and issue $25.00 gold coins, $2.50 silver coins, 25 cent clad coins, and proof silver $2.50 coins in commemoration of the 250th anniversary of the establishment of the United States. The designs of the coins shall be emblematic of the semiquincentennial anniversary of the establishment of the United States of America and celebrate 250 years of our nation. On each coin there shall be

  • a designation of the value of the coin;
  • an inscription of the years 1776-2026; and
  • inscriptions of the words Liberty, In God We Trust, United States of America, and E Pluribus Unum.

Treasury may issue coins under this bill only during the period beginning on January 1, 2026, and ending on December 31, 2026. All sales of coins issued shall include a surcharge as prescribed by this bill. All surcharges received by Treasury from the sale of such coins shall be paid to the America 250 Foundation to fund the restoration, rehabilitation, and interpretation of units of the U.S. National Park System and its related areas, as a legacy of the semiquincentennial commemoration.

Introduced in House — Jul 13, 2021
Referred to the House Committee on Financial Services. — Jul 13, 2021
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/117-HR4429.

S. 2384: Semiquincentennial Commemorative Coin Act
Sponsor: Sen. Patrick J. Toomey (R-PA)
Introduced: July 20, 2021
Introduced in Senate — Jul 20, 2021
Read twice and referred to the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs. — Jul 20, 2021
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/117-S2384.

H.R. 4703: Sultana Steamboat Disaster Commemorative Coin Act of 2021
Sponsor: Rep. Eric A. Crawford (R-AR)
Introduced: July 27, 2021
Summary: This bill directs the Department of the Treasury to mint and issue $5 gold coins, $1 silver coins, and half-dollar clad coins in recognition and remembrance of the Sultana Steamboat explosion of 1865. The designs of the coins shall be emblematic of the historical significance of the Sultana disaster, with special recognition and remembrance given to the lives lost, including the recently released Union soldiers returning home after having been prisoners of war during the American Civil War at Confederate prisons located at Andersonville and Cahaba. Treasury may issue coins minted under this bill to the public only during the one-year period beginning on January 1, 2023. All sales of such coins shall include a surcharge to be paid to the Sultana Historical Preservation Society, Inc. to establish and maintain a new Sultana disaster museum.
Introduced in House — Jul 27, 2021
Referred to the House Committee on Financial Services. — Jul 27, 2021
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/117-HR4703.

H.R. 5232: Working Dog Commemorative Coin Act
Sponsor: Rep. Patrick Mchenry (R-NC)
Introduced: September 10, 2021
Introduced in House — Sep 10, 2021
Referred to the Committee on Financial Services, and in addition to the Committee on the Budget, for a period to be subsequently determined by the Speaker, in each case for consideration of such provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the committee concerned. — Sep 10, 2021
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/117-HR5232.

H.R. 5472: To amend title 31, United States Code, to limit the face value of coins.
Sponsor: Rep. William R. Timmons (R-SC)
Introduced: September 30, 2021
Introduced in House — Sep 30, 2021
Referred to the House Committee on Financial Services. — Sep 30, 2021
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/117-HR5472.

May 2021 Numismatic Legislation Review

Seal of the United States CongressCongress became quiet on the numismatic front in May. After a flurry of vanity bills introduced in March and April, the only bill to be introduced in May was to create a commemorative to raise money for the National World War II Memorial in Washington, D.C.

The National World War II Memorial opened in 2004 to a lot of acclaim for its design. Surrounding a reflecting pool are 56 granite pillars arranged in a semicircle. Each pillar has the name of the 48 states and eight territories at the time of the war. Two sides represent the two theaters of the war, the Atlantic and Pacific.

One of the “Kilroy was here” engravings on the WWII Memorial. (Source: Wikipedia)

On either side of the pool are victory arches to celebrate the victories in Europe and the Pacific. Hidden within the design are two “Kilroy was here” engravings. The phrase’s origin remains a mystery, but it was prevalent where ever U.S. troops were located.

The memorial is open 24 hours a day, and the National Parks Service does not charge admission fees to enter. The only money the NPS receives to maintain the memorial is from the budget process and donations. Neither is enough to prevent the deterioration caused by Washington weather extremes and the wear of visitors. Unfortunately, there has also been vandalism.

Because of the condition problems, groups are looking for ways to raise money to refurbish and improve the memorial. Ideas included the creation of a commemorative coin to help raise money for the construction. If passed, S. 1596 will create a commemorative coin series to raise construction money for the memorial.

S. 1596: A bill to require the Secretary of the Treasury to mint coins in commemoration of the National World War II Memorial in Washington, DC, and for other purposes.
Sponsor: Sen. Mike Rounds (R-SD)
Introduced: May 12, 2021
Introduced in Senate — May 12, 2021
Read twice and referred to the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs. — May 12, 2021
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/117-S1596.
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April 2021 Numismatic Legislation Review

Seal of the United States Congress After posting last month’s Numismatic Legislation Review, someone reminded me that politicians submit bills they know will never be considered. Political watchers call these “vanity bills.” Members of Congress submit vanity bills to have their names published to show the folks at home that they are doing something.

Submitting a bill is easy. Members can develop an idea, format it in the appropriate form, and press a button on their computers to send it to the clerk. Aside from having a standard format, the House of Representatives published instructions on submitting numismatic bills.

Members do not write the bills. Interest groups promoting a cause will write the bill text for the member or written by a staff member.

Rep. Paul Gosar (R-AZ) submitted a bill to create a commemorative coin program for Cesar Chavez. The Arizona-born Chavez founded the National Farm Workers Association to organize farmworkers. Considering the ethnicity of many farmworkers, honoring Chavez will not be popular with certain members of Congress. Even though this bill has almost no chance of passing, Gosar can go home to Arizona and say that he tried.

H.R. 2404: To require the Secretary of the Treasury to mint coins in commemoration of Cesar Chavez's work for the betterment of legal workers, and for other purposes.
Sponsor: Rep. Paul A. Gosar (R-AZ)
Introduced: April 8, 2021
Introduced in House — Apr 8, 2021
Referred to the House Committee on Financial Services. — Apr 8, 2021
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/117-HR2404.

March 2021 Numismatic Legislation Review

Seal of the United States CongressEvery month we look at the numismatic legislation that Congress worked on the previous month. Since the 117th Congress is only three months into its first session, most of the legislative action is introducing bills.

Nowadays, Congress members do not have to drop their papers into the hopper in their respective chambers. Bills are submitted electronically. To prove that they are doing something, these legislators also post the bill on their official websites. Inevitably, an intern or low-level staffer makes a mistake that gets misinterpreted by the press, making it sound like a bill has been passed. According to the Government Printing Office, there has been no numismatic-related bill that has made it past its committee assignment.

A few days ago, Rep. Alexander Mooney (R-WV) introduced H.R. 2285, a bill “To amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to clarify that gain or loss on the sale or exchange of certain coins or bullion is exempt from recognition.” Although this bill’s text has yet to be published, the title suggests that it will make the sale of coins and bullion exempt from capital gains taxes.

Currently, collectors who sell items from their collections are required to pay capital gains taxes on the profit from the sale of their coins. If you bought a coin for $100,000 then sell it for $150,000, the capital gains tax is applied to the $50,000 profit. Under the 2020 rate schedule, that is a 0% tax, except if you bought the coin within the last year, it is taxed as part of your regular income. But if you bought the coin for $50,000 before 2020 and sold it for $150,000 in 2020, then the $100,000 profit is taxed at 15%.

Are you confused? This is why the potential of eliminating the capital gains tax on coins and bullion will help the industry.

Here is the list of the eight bills introduced in March 2021.

H.R. 1648: To require the Secretary of the Treasury to mint coins in recognition and celebration of the National Women’s Hall of Fame.
Sponsor: Rep. Joseph D. Morelle (D-NY)
Introduced: March 8, 2021
Introduced in House — Mar 8, 2021
Referred to the House Committee on Financial Services. — Mar 8, 2021
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/117-HR1648.

S. 672: A bill to amend title 31, United States Code, to save Federal funds by authorizing changes to the composition of circulating coins, and for other purposes.
Sponsor: Sen. Margaret W. Hassan (D-NH)
Introduced: March 10, 2021
Introduced in Senate — Mar 10, 2021
Read twice and referred to the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs. — Mar 10, 2021
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/117-S672.

H.R. 1842: To require the Secretary of the Treasury to mint commemorative coins in recognition of the Bicentennial of Harriet Tubman’s birth.
Sponsor: Rep. Gregory W. Meeks (D-NY)
Introduced: March 11, 2021
Introduced in House — Mar 11, 2021
Referred to the House Committee on Financial Services. — Mar 11, 2021
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/117-HR1842.

H.R. 1789: To amend title 31, United States Code, to save Federal funds by authorizing changes to the composition of circulating coins, and for other purposes.
Sponsor: Rep. Mark E. Amodei (R-NV)
Introduced: March 11, 2021
Introduced in House — Mar 11, 2021
Referred to the Committee on Financial Services, and in addition to the Committees on the Budget, and Rules, for a period to be subsequently determined by the Speaker, in each case for consideration of such provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the committee concerned. — Mar 11, 2021
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/117-HR1789.

S. 697: A bill to require the Secretary of the Treasury to mint commemorative coins in recognition of the Bicentennial of Harriet Tubman’s birth.
Sponsor: Sen. Jacklyn Rosen (D-NV)
Introduced: March 11, 2021
Introduced in Senate — Mar 11, 2021
Read twice and referred to the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs. — Mar 11, 2021
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/117-S697.

H.R. 1900: To require the Secretary of the Treasury to mint coins in commemoration of the health care professionals, first responders, scientists, researchers, all essential workers, and individuals who provided care and services during the coronavirus pandemic.
Sponsor: Rep. Jack Bergman (R-MI)
Introduced: March 16, 2021
Introduced in House — Mar 16, 2021
Referred to the House Committee on Financial Services. — Mar 16, 2021
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/117-HR1900.

S. 867: A bill to require the Secretary of the Treasury to mint coins in recognition and celebration of the National Women’s Hall of Fame.
Sponsor: Sen. Kirsten E. Gillibrand (D-NY)
Introduced: March 18, 2021
Introduced in Senate — Mar 18, 2021
Read twice and referred to the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs. — Mar 18, 2021
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/117-S867.

H.R. 2284: To amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to clarify that gain or loss on the sale or exchange of certain coins or bullion is exempt from recognition.
Sponsor: Rep. Alexander X. Mooney (R-WV)
Introduced: March 29, 2021
Introduced in House — Mar 29, 2021
Referred to the House Committee on Ways and Means. — Mar 29, 2021
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/117-HR2284.
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