2022 Commemorative Coin Programs Pass the Senate

Two commemorative coin bills introduced and passed in the House of Representatives were passed by the Senate this week. Both bills will create commemorative coin programs for 2022.

H.R. 1830: National Purple Heart Hall of Honor Commemorative Coin Act

Purple Heart

Purple Heart Medal (image courtesy of Stars and Stripes)

H.R. 1830 passed the Senate by unanimous consent. The resulting law will create gold $5, silver dollar, and clad half-dollar commemorative coins in honor of the National Purple Heart Hall of Honor in New Windsor, NY. Surcharges will be paid “to the National Purple Heart Hall of Honor, Inc., to support the mission of the National Purple Heart Hall of Honor, Inc., including capital improvements to the National Purple Heart Hall of Honor facilities.”

It would have been interesting to require this coin to be in the shape of a heart. The obverse design could be similar to that of the Purple Heart medal. The reverse could be about the Hall of Honor or the sacrifice made by those awarded the Purple Heart.

I will likely purchase this commemorative coin in honor of my grandfather, a recipient of the Purple Heart for injuries sustained in Europe during World War I.

H. R. 4104: Negro Leagues Baseball Centennial Commemorative Coin Act

(From Twitter)

H. R. 4104 passed the Senate by unanimous consent will create gold $5, silver dollar, and clad half-dollar commemorative coins in honor of the centennial of the Negro Leagues. Although the centennial would be in 2020, the first available commemorative slot will be in 2022. Surcharges will be paid “to the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum for educational and outreach programs and exhibits.” The Negro Leagues Baseball Museum is located in Kansas City, MO.

Although the law will not require these coins to be curved, there is an opportunity for judicious use of color and selective highlights, such as those used for the enhanced strikes.

Both bills will become law when signed by the president.

Now that Congress has begun its Lame Duck session stay tuned for more numismatic bills to pass by unanimous consent.

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October 2020 Numismatic Legislation Review

Seal of the United States CongressAlthough many as said a lot about what Congress is doing, numismatically, there is nothing to report. It is typical for Congress to adjourn during October to allow members to campaign. If Congress takes up any business, they believe that it is beneficial to their campaign. Numismatic-related legislation does not make for compelling campaign ads.

The slowdown in paperwork for the Government Printing Office, who is responsible for publishing Congress’s documentation, uses the time to catch up. Several bills whose text was not posted to the Library of Congress’s website are available for review. As a result, the updates from October are adjusting titles and summaries based on the publishing of the bills’ text.

The 2020 Lame Duck session will be interesting. I do not expect any numismatic legislation to be considered until clean-up sessions in December.

H.R. 8242: National Women’s Hall of Fame Commemorative Coin Act of 2020
Sponsor: Rep. Joseph D. Morelle (D-NY)
Introduced: September 14, 2020
Summary: This bill directs the Department of the Treasury to mint and issue $5 gold coins, $1 silver coins, half-dollar clad coins, and proof silver $1 coins in recognition and celebration of the National Women’s Hall of Fame in Seneca Falls, New York. All minted coins shall include a specified surcharge, which shall be paid to the National Women’s Hall of Fame Foundation to establish an endowment fund to provide for the long-term financing of the hall’s operations.
Referred to the House Committee on Financial Services. — Sep 14, 2020
Introduced in House — Sep 14, 2020
(Updated Bill Summary) — Oct 17, 2020
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/116-HR8242.

S. 4663: Coin Metal Modification Authorization and Cost Savings Act of 2020
Sponsor: Sen. Margaret W. Hassan (D-NH)
Introduced: September 23, 2020
Summary: This bill authorizes the United States Mint to modify the metallic composition of circulating coins (including by prescribing reasonable manufacturing tolerances with respect to those coins) if a study and analysis conducted by the Mint indicates that the modification will

  • reduce costs incurred by.taxpayers;
  • be seamless, which shall be determined by verifying that the coins will work interchangeably in most coin acceptors using electromagnetic signature technology; and
  • have as minimal an adverse impact as possible on the public and stakeholders.

The Mint must notify Congress before making the modification and provide a justification for the modification.

Read twice and referred to the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs. — Sep 23, 2020
Introduced in Senate — Sep 23, 2020
(Updated Bill Title) — Oct 17, 2020
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/116-S4663.
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September 2020 Numismatic Legislation Review

Seal of the United States CongressAt the beginning of every month, I try to summarize the numismatic-related legislation from the previous month. A few months were skipped because they were boring. September was not boring. It was overwhelming because the bills that showed progress are very significant.

H.R. 1923: Circulating Collectible Coin Redesign Act of 2020
Sponsor: Rep. Barbara Lee (D-CA)
Introduced: March 27, 2019
Summary: Women’s History and Nineteenth Amendment Centennial Quarter Dollar Coin Program Act This bill requires the Department of the Treasury to mint and issue quarter-dollar coins in commemoration of the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment granting women the right to vote. The design on the reverse of each coin shall be emblematic of the accomplishments and contributions of a prominent woman who was a resident of a state, the District of Columbia, or a U.S. territory.Such coins shall be issued in alphabetical order of the area represented, starting with the state of Alabama.Treasury shall

  • initiate a program to promote collection of the coins and recognition of their subjects, and
  • strike and make available for sale silver bullion coins that are the exact duplicates of the coins.
Referred to the House Committee on Financial Services. — Mar 27, 2019
Introduced in House — Mar 27, 2019
Committee on Financial Services discharged. — Sep 22, 2020
Mr. Cleaver asked unanimous consent to discharge from committee and consider. — Sep 22, 2020
Considered by unanimous consent. — Sep 22, 2020
On passage Passed without objection. — Sep 22, 2020
Passed/agreed to in House: On passage Passed without objection. — Sep 22, 2020
On passage Passed without objection. (text of amendment in the nature of a substitute: CR H4707-4708) — Sep 22, 2020
Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection. — Sep 22, 2020
The title of the measure was amended. Agreed to without objection. — Sep 22, 2020
Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs. — Sep 23, 2020
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/116-HR1923.

Starting with H.R. 1923, Circulating Collectible Coin Redesign Act of 2020, it became a catchall bill to make many changes to the U.S. Mint’s circulating coin programs. Initially, the bill began as a proposal to create a series of circulating quarters honoring Women’s History and the Nineteenth Amendment. Since it was a convenient vehicle, other series ideas were added.

If the bill passes the Senate, the following will change your pocket change:

Quarters

  • 2022-2025: Accomplishment of American Women, 5 per year
  • 2026: U.S. Semiquincentennial, up to 5
  • 2027-2030: Sports Played by American Youth, 5 per year

Half-Dollars

  • 2027-2030: Paralympic Sports

Dollars

  • 2026: U.S. Semiquincentennial

Medals

  • 2027-2030: Accompanying Sports Medals
  • 2028: Manufacture medals for the 2028 Olympic Games in Los Angeles

Silver Bullion Coins

  • 5-ounce coins based on the quarter and half-dollar designs
  • Can produce “ fractional” silver bullion coins

George Washington will continue to appear on the obverse but “be designed in a manner, such as with incused inscriptions, so as to distinguish it from the obverse design used during the previous quarters program.” Does this mean that the John Flannagan design and its many permutations can be retired for something a little more attractive? Replacing the Flannagan design for the Laura Gardin Fraser design would be appropriate.

The bill includes similar language for the image of John F. Kennedy on the 2026 Semiquincentennial half-dollar.

H.R. 4104: Negro Leagues Baseball Centennial Commemorative Coin Act
Sponsor: Rep. Emanuel Cleaver (D-MO)
Introduced: July 30, 2019
Summary: This bill directs the Department of the Treasury to mint and issue up to 50,000 $5 gold coins, 400,000 $1 silver coins, and 750,000 half-dollar clad coins in commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the establishment of the Negro National League, a professional baseball league that was formed in response to African-American players being banned from baseball’s major leagues.The design of the coins shall be emblematic of the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum and its mission to promote tolerance, diversity, and inclusion.All surcharges from sales of these coins shall be paid to the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum to fund educational and outreach programs and exhibits.
Referred to the House Committee on Financial Services. — Jul 30, 2019
Introduced in House — Jul 30, 2019
Committee on Financial Services discharged. — Sep 22, 2020
Committee on Financial Services discharged. — Sep 22, 2020
Mr. Cleaver asked unanimous consent to discharge from committee and consider. — Sep 22, 2020
Considered by unanimous consent. — Sep 22, 2020
On passage Passed without objection. — Sep 22, 2020
Passed/agreed to in House: On passage Passed without objection. — Sep 22, 2020
On passage Passed without objection. (text of amendment in the nature of a substitute: CR H4710) — Sep 22, 2020
Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection. — Sep 22, 2020
Received in the Senate. — Sep 23, 2020
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/116-HR4104.

H.R. 4104, Negro Leagues Baseball Centennial Commemorative Coin Act, is a typically formatted commemorative coin program for 2022 to honor the Negro Leagues’ centennial. Surcharges will be paid to the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum.

H.R. 6192: 1921 Silver Dollar Coin Anniversary Act
Sponsor: Rep. Andy Barr (R-KY)
Introduced: March 11, 2020
Introduced in House — Mar 11, 2020
Referred to the House Committee on Financial Services. — Mar 11, 2020
Committee on Financial Services discharged. — Sep 22, 2020
Committee on Financial Services discharged. — Sep 22, 2020
Mr. Cleaver asked unanimous consent to discharge from committee and consider. — Sep 22, 2020
Considered by unanimous consent. — Sep 22, 2020
On passage Passed without objection. — Sep 22, 2020
Passed/agreed to in House: On passage Passed without objection. — Sep 22, 2020
On passage Passed without objection. (text of amendment in the nature of a substitute: CR H4711-4712) — Sep 22, 2020
Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection. — Sep 22, 2020
Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs. — Sep 23, 2020
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/116-HR6192.

H.R. 6192, 1921 Silver Dollar Coin Anniversary Act, will allow the U.S. Mint to produce a Morgan and Peace Dollar in 2021. These coins may contain more than the original 90-percent silver of the original.

The rest of the bills were introduced in September. There is not much to talk about until something happens, which is not likely until the lame-duck session.

H.R. 8242: National Women’s Hall of Fame Commemorative Coin Act of 2020
Sponsor: Rep. Joseph D. Morelle (D-NY)
Introduced: September 14, 2020
Referred to the House Committee on Financial Services. — Sep 14, 2020
Introduced in House — Sep 14, 2020
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/116-HR8242.

S. 4663: A bill to amend title 31, United States Code, to save Federal funds by authorizing changes to the composition of circulating coins, and for other purposes.
Sponsor: Sen. Margaret W. Hassan (D-NH)
Introduced: September 23, 2020
Read twice and referred to the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs. — Sep 23, 2020
Introduced in Senate — Sep 23, 2020
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/116-S4663.

S. 4730: A bill to amend title 31, United States Code, to require the Secretary of the Treasury to mint and issue quarter dollars in commemoration of the Nineteenth Amendment, and for other purposes.
Sponsor: Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto (D-NV)
Introduced: September 24, 2020
Read twice and referred to the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs. — Sep 24, 2020
Introduced in Senate — Sep 24, 2020
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/116-S4730.
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June 2020 Numismatic Legislation Review (a little late)

Don't set the DeLorean to 2020There is a meme going around the Interwebs that shows Doc Brown (Christopher Lloyd) getting out of his modified DeLorean with Marty McFly (Michael J. Fox) standing there with Brown telling Marty not to set the time machine to 2020. If you do not understand the meme, I recommend you stream Back to the Future on your favorite streaming platform. It is a classic movie!

We are 13 days into July, and I realized that June was over, and the Legislative Update was due. Then again, we discussed the only legislation that Congres introduced in June. Otherwise, there is nothing to report on the legislation front.

S. 4006: Coin Metal Modification Authorization and Cost Savings Act of 2020
Sponsor: Sen. Margaret W. Hassan (D-NH)
Introduced: June 18, 2020
Read twice and referred to the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs. — Jun 18, 2020
Introduced in Senate — Jun 18, 2020
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/116-S4006.

Weekly World Numismatic News for June 28, 2020

2018 Lincoln CentSomewhere along the line, logic and reality have not reconciled the meme that cash is dead because everyone uses credit cards. Although there has been an increase in credit card usage because of the COVID-19 pandemic and quarantine orders, banks and retail outlets have been reporting a shortage of cash.

For the most part, the U.S. Mint coin manufacturing processes have been fully operational during the pandemic except closing West Point briefly. The coin factory is mostly automated and does not require many workers. The U.S. Mint reports that the offices that include in the engravers are working from home, but the manufacturing continues.

But reports from the St. Louis Federal Reserve noted that even with the reduction in foot traffic, the rate of people paying with cash remained steady. The San Francisco Federal Reserve noted that the rise in credit card use coincides with the increase in online shopping.

The U.S. Mint is not the cause of supply chain problems. The problems are within the Federal Reserve and how they operate their coin storage. When Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell discussed the coin shortage, he also said that the problems magnified when the quarantine impacted the logistics companies that move the coins from place to place.

Like many things, congress took the wrong message from Powell and prompted what may be a necessary action but for the wrong reasons. Sens. Mike Enzi (R-WY), and Maggie Hassan (D-NH) introduced the Coin Metal Modification Authorization and Cost Savings Act (S. 4006) to allow the U.S. Mint to change the metal used in your change.

While the senators are patting themselves on the back for looking like they are doing something, changing coning metals will not help. Although the U.S. Mint has studied alternative metals, several steps will take many years to complete. Canada and the United Kingdom have to change coins and coining metals in recent years. Both countries made the transition in four years and continued to have problems.

Another lesson learned is that to help Canada and the U.K. to make the transition, their respective central banks demonetized the old coins. The United States does not demonetize its coinage. Even with significant media coverage, the Bank of England reports over £1 million of demonetized coins in the public’s hands.

When the United States transitioned from silver to base metals, a six-year transition did not go as planned. We learned later that the U.S. Mint continued to produce silver coins in 1965 and 1966 with 1964 dates to ease market pressures.

Changes to coining metals may be necessary. Over the last ten years, the U.S. Mint has seen seignorage reduced as the price of copper and nickel rise. But to tie the change in metals to the pandemic is a very congressional thing to do.

And now the news…

 June 22, 2020
This year, a new coin act might be the making to bring back the Peace and Morgan Silver Dollars in 2021. This will honor the centennial of the transition from the Morgan to the Peace Silver Dollar. However, in the United States, only two commemorative coin programs can be active per year – and Congress has already passed the Law Enforcement Commemorative Coin Act and the Christa McAuliffe Commemorative Coin Act.  → Read more at valuewalk.com

 June 24, 2020
Wayne Fournier was sitting in a town meeting when he had his big idea.  As the mayor of Tenino, Washington (population: 1,884), he’d watched the pandemic rake local businesses.  → Read more at thehustle.co

 June 26, 2020
Gold insider Edmund Moy is all in on gold coins as an investment with prices for the yellow metal on a strong upswing. And he shared with Yahoo Finance how he is protecting his investment. “So I keep a little bit.  → Read more at finance.yahoo.com

 June 26, 2020
U.S. Senators Mike Enzi, R-Wyo., and Maggie Hassan, D-N.H., have introduced bipartisan legislation to allow the U.S. Mint to adjust the metal content of circulating coins in an effort to save taxpayer dollars.  → Read more at highlandcountypress.com

 June 26, 2020
Dive Brief: • The National Grocers Association (NGA) along with five other retail industry groups have called on the federal government to take "rapid action" to address a national coin shortage, according to a press release.  → Read more at grocerydive.com
Coin Collectors News
news.coinsblog.ws

 

May 2020 Numismatic Legislation Review

Seal of the United States CongressDays keep blending together as we try to survive major crises in this country. With the justified outrage over the killing of George Floyd, reports are coming out that coronavirus deaths are beginning to rise. Since the protests are largely attended by young people, it will change the narrative that the virus is particularly deadly to those older and to those with pre-existing conditions. Then again, many people do not know they have a pre-existing condition until it is triggered by something else.

Frontline health care professionals and others are fighting the disease and, in some cases, injuries that occurred during the protests. To celebrate these essential workers Rep. Jack Bergman (R-MI) introduced a commemorative coin program in their honor. Although the bill was introduced, the text has yet to be published. All we know is the title as submitted. It might be nice to honor the frontline workers, the likelihood of this type of bill passing is not good given the current political climate.

Unless the current circumstances change, it is unlikely any numismatic-related legislation will be acted on before the end-of-session cleanup votes in December.

H.R. 6923: To require the Secretary of the Treasury to mint coins in commemoration of the health care professionals, first responders, scientists, researchers, all essential workers, and individuals who provided care and services during the coronavirus pandemic.
Sponsor: Rep. Jack Bergman (R-MI)
Introduced: May 19, 2020
Referred to the House Committee on Financial Services. — May 19, 2020
Introduced in House — May 19, 2020
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/116-HR6923.

April 2020 Numismatic Legislation Review

Seal of the United States CongressAlthough the calendar passed May the Fourth (be with you) and Cinco de Mayo, the days are running together that the one thing I forgot was the end of April. Days are blurring together to the point that I forgot that Thursday was senior day at some local stores. I do not mind the label of a senior citizen. It means that I survived to wear that moniker.

So that I can correct this senior moment, it is time to talk about the one numismatic-related bill introduced in the House of Representatives in April.

H.R. 6555: United States Semiquincentennial Quarter Series Act
Sponsor: Rep. Bonnie Watson coleman (D-NJ)
Introduced: April 17, 2020
Referred to the House Committee on Financial Services. — Apr 17, 2020
Introduced in House — Apr 17, 2020
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/116-HR6555.

The United States Semiquincentennial Quarter Series Act (H.R. 6555) would create a five quarters program to celebrate the U.S. Semiquincentennial (250 years) in 2026. If the bill passes, the U.S. Mint will “issue quarter dollars in 2026 with up to five different designs emblematic of the United States semiquincentennial. One of the quarter dollar designs must be emblematic of a woman’s or women’s contribution to the birth of the Nation or the Declaration of Independence or any other monumental moments in American History.”

According to the bill, the Secretary “may” mint “$1 coins with designs emblematic of the United States semiquincentennial.”

H.R. 6555 takes a different approach than the Bicentennial coinage. For the Bicentennial, the program lasted two years, 1975-1976. The coins were dated 1776-1976, and the reverse of the quarter, half-dollar, and dollar coins were redesigned. The previous designs returned in 1977.

The country is busy with other issues rather than being concerned with the nation’s semiquincentennial. But it is nice to think about a celebration than the worries we are going through today.
 

1976-S Silver Proof Bicentennial Autograph Set

No 2021 Silver Dollars For You!

The 2021 commemorative coin calendar is full and it does not include a commemorative Morgan or Peace silver dollar.

Last October, Congress passed the Christa McAuliffe Commemorative Coin Act of 2019 (Public Law No. 116-65) to be issued in 2021. In December, they passed the National Law Enforcement Museum Commemorative Coin Act (as part of Public Law No. 116-94). With two commemorative coin programs in 2021, there is no room for the 1921 Silver Dollar Commemorative Coin Act.

The odds of Congress creating a third commemorative program for 2021 is less than 1-percent.

When H.R. 3757 was introduced, the American Numismatic Association sent out a press release and asked the members to write their member of Congress. The numismatic press also carried that mantle at the beginning. Some suggested that a commemorative Morgan Dollar could be struck at the former mint in Carson City.

But that was in July, 2019, prior to the World’s Fair of Money.

During the World’s Fair of Money, a new Board of Governors was installed to allegedly lead the ANA. Since then, there has been little said by the ANA about H.R. 3757. This is the opposite of the response lead by Farran Zerbe.

Zerbe’s proposal for what became the Peace Dollar led to the appointment of a committee that lobbied Congress for the coin’s creation. It was not an easy road for the proposal, but Zerbe persisted, and a bill was passed.

Zerbe, who was ANA President from 1908 t0 1910, showed extraordinary leadership in getting this bill passed.

Many others have stepped up to represent the community with the support of the ANA and the hobby. Amongst the community’s achievements are the Bicentennial coins and the 50 State Quarters program.

Where is that support today?

Where has the ANA been since August 2019?

Like the 1921 Peace Dollar, a 2021 commemorative coin would not only highlight history but make sure the public knows about the ANA’s place in that history. It would introduce new collectors to one of the 20th century’s best designs and the ANA at the same time.

Aside from the public relations boost, 40-percent of the program’s surcharge would be paid to the ANA. With a mintage limit of 500,000 coins with a surcharge of $10 per coin, a potential $2 million could have been added to the ANA’s treasury.

A one-time payment of $2 million would provide a cushion of 35-percent, based on the ANA’s published 2019 budget. It would furnish a down payment on new education initiatives and outreach to promote the ANA’s growth.

The ANA has been business-as-usual with little said from the current Board.

It is difficult to understand why the ANA Board of Governors would let this opportunity pass. Is this a sign of leadership we are to expect during its two-year term?

October 2019 Numismatic Legislation Review

Challenger Crew

The STS-51L crewmembers are: in the back row from left to right: Mission Specialist, Ellison S. Onizuka, Teacher in Space Participant Sharon Christa McAuliffe, Payload Specialist, Greg Jarvis and Mission Specialist, Judy Resnik. In the front row from left to right: Pilot Mike Smith, Commander, Dick Scobee and Mission Specialist, Ron McNair. (Wikipedia)

The numismatic legislation news of the month is the president signing the Christa McAuliffe Commemorative Coin Act of 2019 (Public Law No. 116-65) into law. In 2021, the U.S. Mint will issue no more than 350,000 silver dollars in commemoration of Christa McAuliffe.

For those who do not remember or were not born at the time, McAuliffe was selected as the first civilian teacher to fly into space as part of the Space Shuttle program. On January 28, 1986, she boarded the Space Shuttle Challenger along with Francis R. Scobee, Michael J. Smith, Ronald McNair, Ellison Onizuka, Judith Resnik, and Gregory Jarvis for mission STS-51-L. Challenger lifted off from Cape Canaveral at 11:39 AM.

It was an unusually cold morning, even for Florida. The cold and deterioration of the O-Rings that sealed the joints of the solid rocket boosters failed. The firey escape of fuel caused the external fuel tank to explode 73 seconds into the flight. Challenger disintegrated, taking the lives of the seven-member crew.

The surcharge of $10 per coin sold in 2021 will be paid to the For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology (FIRST) robotics program “for the purpose of engaging and inspiring young people, through mentor-based programs, to become leaders in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.”

S. 239: Christa McAuliffe Commemorative Coin Act of 2019
Sponsor: Sen. Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH)
Introduced: January 28, 2019
Summary: (Sec. 3) This bill directs the Department of the Treasury to mint and issue not more than 350,000 $1 silver coins in commemoration of Christa McAuliffe, a teacher tragically killed in the Space Shuttle Challenger Disaster.(Sec. 4) The design of the coins shall bear an image and the name of Christa McAuliffe on the obverse side and a design on the reverse side that depicts the legacy of McAuliffe as a teacher.(Sec. 5) Treasury may issue the coins from January 1-December 31, 2021.(Sec. 7) All surcharges received by Treasury from the sale of the coins shall be paid to the FIRST robotics program for the purpose of engaging and inspiring young people, through mentor-based programs, to become leaders in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.
Read twice and referred to the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs. — Jan 28, 2019
Passed Senate with amendments by Voice Vote. — Jul 9, 2019
Measure laid before Senate by unanimous consent. — Jul 9, 2019
Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs discharged by Unanimous Consent. — Jul 9, 2019
Message on Senate action sent to the House. — Jul 10, 2019
Received in the House. — Jul 10, 2019
Held at the desk. — Jul 10, 2019
Ms. Waters moved to suspend the rules and pass the bill. — Sep 19, 2019
Considered under suspension of the rules. — Sep 19, 2019
DEBATE – The House proceeded with forty minutes of debate on S. 239. — Sep 19, 2019
On motion to suspend the rules and pass the bill Agreed to by voice vote. — Sep 19, 2019
Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection. — Sep 19, 2019
Presented to President. — Sep 27, 2019
Signed by President. — Oct 9, 2019
This law can be viewed at http://bit.ly/116-S239.

The House also passed the Women’s Suffrage Centennial Commemorative Coin Act (H.R. 2423) for 2020 and the National Law Enforcement Museum Commemorative Coin Act (H.R. 1865) for 2021. Both bills head to the Senate for their consideration.

H.R. 1865: National Law Enforcement Museum Commemorative Coin Act
Sponsor: Rep. William J. Pascrell (D-NJ)
Introduced: March 25, 2019
Summary: This bill directs the Department of the Treasury to mint and issue up to 50,000 $5 gold coins, 400,000 $1 silver coins, and 750,000 half-dollar clad coins that are emblematic of the National Law Enforcement Museum in the District of Columbia and the service and sacrifice of law enforcement officers throughout the history of the United States.All sales of such coins shall include specified surcharges, which shall be distributed to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund, Inc., for educational and outreach programs and exhibits.
Referred to the House Committee on Financial Services. — Mar 25, 2019
Mr. Scott, David moved to suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended. — Oct 28, 2019
Considered under suspension of the rules. — Oct 28, 2019
DEBATE – The House proceeded with forty minutes of debate on H.R. 1865. — Oct 28, 2019
On motion to suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended Agreed to by voice vote. — Oct 28, 2019
Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection. — Oct 28, 2019
Received in the Senate. — Oct 29, 2019
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/116-HR1865.

H.R. 2423: Women’s Suffrage Centennial Commemorative Coin Act
Sponsor: Rep. Elise M. Stefanik (R-NY)
Introduced: April 30, 2019
Summary: This bill directs the Department of the Treasury to mint and issue up to 400,000 $1 silver coins that are emblematic of the women who played a vital role in rallying support for the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.Such coins may be issued during the period beginning on January 1, 2020, and ending on December 31, 2020.All surcharges received from the sales of such coins shall be paid to the American Women’s History Initiative of the Smithsonian Institution.
Referred to the House Committee on Financial Services. — Apr 30, 2019
Mr. Scott, David moved to suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended. — Oct 28, 2019
Considered under suspension of the rules. — Oct 28, 2019
DEBATE – The House proceeded with forty minutes of debate on H.R. 2423. — Oct 28, 2019
On motion to suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended Agreed to by voice vote. — Oct 28, 2019
Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection. — Oct 28, 2019
Received in the Senate. — Oct 29, 2019
Received in the Senate, read twice. — Oct 29, 2019
Passed Senate without amendment by Unanimous Consent. — Oct 31, 2019
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/116-HR2423.

Two additional commemorative coin bills were introduced in the House of Representatives. One is so new that the Government Printing Office has yet to release the official text.

H.R. 4681: National World War II Memorial Commemorative Coin Act
Sponsor: Rep. Marcy Kaptur (D-OH)
Introduced: October 15, 2019
Referred to the House Committee on Financial Services. — Oct 15, 2019
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/116-HR4681.

H.R. 4940: To require the Secretary of the Treasury to mint coins in commemoration of the 200th anniversary of the establishment of the Nation’s first statewide investigative law enforcement agency, the Ranger Division of the Texas Department of Public Safety.
Sponsor: Rep. Bill Flores (R-TX)
Introduced: October 31, 2019
Referred to the House Committee on Financial Services. — Oct 31, 2019
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/116-HR4940.

September 2019 Numismatic Legislation Review

Seal of the United States CongressThe numismatic industry is all a buzz about a pending new commemorative coin. When signed by the president, the Christa McAuliffe Commemorative Coin Act (S. 239) will create the first commemorative coin for 2021.

The bill calls for a maximum of 350,000 silver dollar commemorative coins in memory of Christa McAuliffe, the teacher killed as part of the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster.

Congress sent the bill to the White House on September 27, 2019. It is waiting for a signature which should happen soon.

S. 239: Christa McAuliffe Commemorative Coin Act of 2019
Sponsor: Sen. Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH)
Introduced: January 28, 2019
Summary: (Sec. 3) This bill directs the Department of the Treasury to mint and issue not more than 350,000 $1 silver coins in commemoration of Christa McAuliffe, a teacher tragically killed in the Space Shuttle Challenger Disaster.(Sec. 4) The design of the coins shall bear an image and the name of Christa McAuliffe on the obverse side and a design on the reverse side that depicts the legacy of McAuliffe as a teacher.(Sec. 5) Treasury may issue the coins from January 1-December 31, 2021.(Sec. 7) All surcharges received by Treasury from the sale of the coins shall be paid to the FIRST robotics program for the purpose of engaging and inspiring young people, through mentor-based programs, to become leaders in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.
Read twice and referred to the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs. — Jan 28, 2019
Passed Senate with amendments by Voice Vote. — Jul 9, 2019
Measure laid before Senate by unanimous consent. — Jul 9, 2019
Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs discharged by Unanimous Consent. — Jul 9, 2019
Message on Senate action sent to the House. — Jul 10, 2019
Received in the House. — Jul 10, 2019
Held at the desk. — Jul 10, 2019
Ms. Waters moved to suspend the rules and pass the bill. — Sep 19, 2019
Considered under suspension of the rules. — Sep 19, 2019
DEBATE – The House proceeded with forty minutes of debate on S. 239. — Sep 19, 2019
On motion to suspend the rules and pass the bill Agreed to by voice vote. — Sep 19, 2019
Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection. — Sep 19, 2019
Presented to President. — Sep 27, 2019
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/116-S239.

This bill and the Women’s Suffrage Centennial Commemorative Coin Act (S.1235) were being held at the desk in the House because of an objection made by a freshman member. The member was convinced to let the bills pass and to use other bills to make the point.

Just a typical day on Capitol Hill.

H.R. 1830: National Purple Heart Hall of Honor Commemorative Coin Act
Sponsor: Rep. Sean P. Maloney (D-NY)
Introduced: March 18, 2019
Summary: This bill directs the Department of the Treasury to mint and issue $5 gold coins, $1 silver coins, and half-dollar clad coins emblematic of the National Purple Heart Hall of Honor.The bill limits the issuance of such coins to the one-year period beginning on January 1, 2021.The bill prescribes surcharges for coin sales, which shall be paid to the National Purple Heart Hall of Honor, Inc., to support the mission of such organization, including capital improvements to the National Purple Heart Hall of Honor facilities.
Referred to the House Committee on Financial Services. — Mar 18, 2019
Mr. San Nicolas moved to suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended. — Sep 19, 2019
Considered under suspension of the rules. — Sep 19, 2019
DEBATE – The House proceeded with forty minutes of debate on H.R. 1830. — Sep 19, 2019
On motion to suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended Agreed to by voice vote. — Sep 19, 2019
Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection. — Sep 19, 2019
Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs. — Sep 23, 2019
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/116-HR1830.

H.R. 4332: Paul Laurence Dunbar Commemorative Coin Act
Sponsor: Rep. Eleanor H. Norton (D-DC)
Introduced: September 13, 2019
Referred to the House Committee on Financial Services. — Sep 13, 2019
This bill can be tracked at http://bit.ly/116-HR4332.

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