SCAM ALERT: LIACOO IS SELLING FAKE SILVER EAGLES!

Fake Silver Eagles

Two counterfeit American Silver Eagles purchased from LIACOO, a company based in China.

Last month I posted an article about a potential scam by a company named LIACOO selling American Silver Eagle coins from China. I ordered two coins to confirm my suspicion.

THE COINS ARE COUNTERFEIT! FAKES!

I ordered the coins on June 4, the day I posted the article. The coins were shipped from China to California to New Jersey to my office. LIACOO used the services of Newgistics, which is now a subsidiary of Pitney-Bowes. By using a logistics company in this manner, they can hide behind the anonymity of the service.

Contacting Pitney-Bowes is nearly impossible. I left a very public message on Twitter. Let’s see if they respond.

When the coins arrived, I opened the package and started to examine the contents. The coins are in a slab-like holder similar to the Coin World holders but without the Coin World logo. At first glance, they look fine, and then a closer look revealed problems.

My first impression was that there are almost no rims on the coin. A closer look at the obverse, and the font is too thin for the LIBERTY around the coin. Then I turned the coin over to focus on the U in United. It is missing the tail on the right side of the U. I did not need to see any more to be convinced this was a fake coin.

Finally, I removed the coin to weigh it. An American Silver Eagle is supposed to weigh just slightly more than one troy ounce because it is only .999 silver. Since my scale only measures grams to the tenths of ounces, it should have weighed 31.1 grams. It weighed 25 grams.

The coin is not magnetic.

I will investigate further, but I wanted to report my initial findings.

DO NOT BUY CHEAP EAGLES FROM RANDOM WEBSITES!

I bought these coins to prove my point. I knew I was potentially buying fakes. I spent less than $30 for education aids.

Unfortunately, two correspondents wrote to tell me they each bought ten coins from different dealers. They spent $19.95 per coin. Both lost over $200 with the shipping costs.

IF YOU CANNOT IDENTIFY THE DEALER, THEIR EXACT LOCATION, AND THEIR BUSINESS STATUS, THEN DO NOT BUY THEIR COINS!

LIACOO is a scam. It is a company based in China. DO NOT BUT FROM THEM!

Weekly World Numismatic News for July 5, 2020

2020 American Gold EagleAn article on Yahoo Finance asked the same question many have asked me: are the high premiums for physical gold a scam or a supply crisis?

Gold is in high demand. As a safe haven for uncertain markets, the current markets have driven investors looking to have some stability in their portfolio. Some have suggested that the preppers, those who prepare themselves for a pending disaster, have been hoarding gold. A favorite among preppers is the small 1 gram through 10 gram gold bars because they will be more useful in daily transactions.

According to market analysts, the demand outpaced the available supply. The available supply is what is available to buy. The problem was that the pandemic caused many supply chains to break down with precious metals stuck somewhere and not being delivered to the buyers.

Another problem in the supply was the perception that the demand could not be satisfied after the West Point Mint’s temporary closing. Although the Philadelphia Mint stepped in to produce silver coins, the gold coin production stopped. Subsequently, there were conflicting reports on whether there was enough physical gold entering the supply chain or whether the gold was not getting to the sellers because of the pandemic.

During the shutdown, there were reports that gold mining slowed or stopped as travel became limited. It was also a problem when the major Swiss gold retailers had to shut down because of the quarantine since most as near the Italian border. While gold was available on the secondary market, perception became that if these retailers were closed, there would not be enough for the future. The uncertainty caused the gold buyers to increase their purchases.

One gold dealer reported that they had sufficient gold to satisfy the market but not in the form the customers wanted. The demand for American Gold Eagle exceeded their supply while the non-Swiss made bars were not selling. Customers that demanded Canadian Gold Maple Leaf coins were also disappointed but refused to buy gold coins from other European mints.

There is also no consistency between the premiums dealers charge. Some of the larger dealers use software to calculate the market price that examines other online sales to determine an average. Smaller dealers have said that they watch what the larger dealers are charging and adjust their premium below the average.

Nearly every analyst is bullish on the future of gold pricing. Being bullish on gold means that those watching the markets are not comfortable with the equities market’s stability. We can be in for a bumpy ride.

And now the news…

 June 26, 2020
During the coronavirus crisis many people couldn’t find physical gold, as there was a bullion shortage at dealerships. And these lucky individuals who managed to obtain bullion had to pay high premiums.  → Read more at finance.yahoo.com

 June 27, 2020
COLUMBUS — Letters to Gov. Mike DeWine urging him to grant clemency to Coingate central figure Tom Noe came with something that could help in any plan for the former Toledo area coin dealer to pay back the $12.7 million in taxpayer funding he still owes — job offers.  → Read more at toledoblade.com

 June 27, 2020
In Vermont, the year 1927 is primarily remembered for the great flood in November – the most devastating event in the Green Mountain State’s modern history. But it was also the year of Vermont’s sesquicentennial, or 150th birthday. Although the event was marked with a pageant in Bennington on Aug. 16, there were other celebrations and remembrances of the founding of the Vermont Republic. There were also two commemorations that originated from the federal government in Washington, D.C.: the issue of a two-cent postage stamp and the minting of a silver coin.  → Read more at timesargus.com

 June 29, 2020
EDMONTON — The Royal Canadian Mint released a special medal Monday meant to recognize the everyday heroes of the COVID-19 pandemic. The wearable recognition medal was designed as a symbol of gratitude for essential workers and others who have helped keep Canadians safe, healthy and connected through the COVID-19 crisis.  → Read more at edmonton.ctvnews.ca

 June 30, 2020
A rare silver penny found in a field dating to 1150 and made out to a local Yorkshire baron rather than King John is due to be auctioned.  → Read more at yorkshirepost.co.uk

 July 1, 2020
CHAMPLAIN — U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers assigned to the Champlain Port of Entry Cargo Facility recently discovered seven Sasanian coins being shipped into the United States. CBP officers assigned to the cargo facility encountered a shipment manifested as documents on June 2 and found nine unrecognizable foreign coins upon further inspection of the package, according to a press release.  → Read more at pressrepublican.com
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James Earle Fraser and A Controversial Statue

Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Hall entrance

Equestrian Statue of Theodore Roosevelt at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. (Wikipedia)

Last week, the American Museum of Natural History requested that New York City remove the Equestrian Statue of Theodore Roosevelt at its front door. James Earle Fraser designed the statue.

Since Roosevelt’s death, Fraser was asked to design three different statues honoring the 26th President with themes picked by the sponsors. The theme was chosen for this statue by the Roosevelt Memorial Association. The statue would honor Roosevelt and the indigenous people in the Badlands of South Dakota and the Africans he met during his post-presidency safari. They were meant to be allegorical figures, not real people.

Theodore Roosevelt was a fascinating personality. TR was fond of the Badlands area, the area of the Dakota territory around the Little Missouri River. In his autobiography, Roosevelt admitted that he used his trips to the Badlands as an escape. The trips started after the death of his first wife, Alice, who died within days of giving birth to their only child.

Roosevelt stopped talking about Alice after her death. Until he wrote his autobiography, the last statement Roosevelt made about Alice was in his diary, where he wrote, “The light has gone out of my life.” Some scholars believe that Roosevelt’s trips to the Badlands were his attempt to combat depression or post-traumatic stress following Alice’s death.

Following his presidency, Roosevelt went on a safari in Africa and a trip through Europe. In Africa, Roosevelt’s safari was a research project sponsored by Andrew Carnegie that would bring back specimens for the Smithsonian Institue and the American Museum of Natural History.

His guide through Africa was a British national RJ Cunninghame. Aside from his knowledge of the region, Cunninghame knew many natives who can lead them around the land. In each of the countries, the local guides were natives.

In his autobiography, Roosevelt would credit the native people for helping on his trips. It was clear that Theodore Roosevelt would not have been associated with these people in other areas of his life. Still, his writing demonstrated a lot of respect for their guidance.

James Earle Fraser

James Earle Fraser, ca. 1920 (Wikipedia)

Fraser was consulted many times by the Roosevelt Memorial Association. It was due to his being an accomplice to Roosevelt’s “pet crime,” the redesign of the nation’s coinage. Fraser, who was an assistant to Augustus Saint-Gaudens, understood the imagery the President wanted that became the inspiration for the Buffalo Nickel.

Frasier’s style was called Beaux-Arts, which relied on neoclassical-like images. Frasier was the designer of the Buffalo Nickel and other commemorative coins. Frasier’s style was called Beaux-Arts, which relied on neoclassical-like images. Frasier took Beaux-Arts to a new level by studying his subjects’ history and incorporating them into the imagery.

All of Frasier’s work has many elements that have to be studied to be appreciated. Numismatists can see his attention to detail by studying a Type 1 Buffalo Nickel with a loupe. The detail gives the coin a lot of character that makes it an appealing collectible. When the U.S. Mint tried to recreate the design for the 2001 commemorative coin, collectors were not satisfied with the flatter image.

The 24-karat Gold Buffalo coin is a good representation of Frasier’s Type 1 Buffalo Nickel design. John Mercanti’s execution of Fraser’s design is phenomenal.

Many of the statues in tribute to the 26th President show Roosevelt on a horse. Fraser was consulted about two other Roosevelt memorial statues. The statue Fraser proposed that is now on Roosevelt Island in New York’s East River was similar in design to the Equestrian Statue at the Museum of Natural History. The other was a statue to be part of the Theodore Roosevelt Island in the Potomac River near Georgetown. It depicted Roosevelt on a horse without the guides. Fraser died before funding for the statue was realized.

Fraser’s image for the statue was clear. It was the two indigenous people working to support Roosevelt’s adventures. These are not racist images, even when it has been badly misinterpreted by some media who call the person to Roosevelt’s left an African-American.

Unfortunately, the current society has lost the ability to reason beyond the surface at allegorical symbols that are supposed to honor rather than demean. It takes a higher sense of forethought to understand what is being depicted. A value that is lacking today. Understanding the history of the man and the imagery offered by Fraser something to be admired. It is a work of art that needs to be preserved and not run over by a politically correct freight train.

Weekly World Numismatic News for June 28, 2020

2018 Lincoln CentSomewhere along the line, logic and reality have not reconciled the meme that cash is dead because everyone uses credit cards. Although there has been an increase in credit card usage because of the COVID-19 pandemic and quarantine orders, banks and retail outlets have been reporting a shortage of cash.

For the most part, the U.S. Mint coin manufacturing processes have been fully operational during the pandemic except closing West Point briefly. The coin factory is mostly automated and does not require many workers. The U.S. Mint reports that the offices that include in the engravers are working from home, but the manufacturing continues.

But reports from the St. Louis Federal Reserve noted that even with the reduction in foot traffic, the rate of people paying with cash remained steady. The San Francisco Federal Reserve noted that the rise in credit card use coincides with the increase in online shopping.

The U.S. Mint is not the cause of supply chain problems. The problems are within the Federal Reserve and how they operate their coin storage. When Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell discussed the coin shortage, he also said that the problems magnified when the quarantine impacted the logistics companies that move the coins from place to place.

Like many things, congress took the wrong message from Powell and prompted what may be a necessary action but for the wrong reasons. Sens. Mike Enzi (R-WY), and Maggie Hassan (D-NH) introduced the Coin Metal Modification Authorization and Cost Savings Act (S. 4006) to allow the U.S. Mint to change the metal used in your change.

While the senators are patting themselves on the back for looking like they are doing something, changing coning metals will not help. Although the U.S. Mint has studied alternative metals, several steps will take many years to complete. Canada and the United Kingdom have to change coins and coining metals in recent years. Both countries made the transition in four years and continued to have problems.

Another lesson learned is that to help Canada and the U.K. to make the transition, their respective central banks demonetized the old coins. The United States does not demonetize its coinage. Even with significant media coverage, the Bank of England reports over Ā£1 million of demonetized coins in the public’s hands.

When the United States transitioned from silver to base metals, a six-year transition did not go as planned. We learned later that the U.S. Mint continued to produce silver coins in 1965 and 1966 with 1964 dates to ease market pressures.

Changes to coining metals may be necessary. Over the last ten years, the U.S. Mint has seen seignorage reduced as the price of copper and nickel rise. But to tie the change in metals to the pandemic is a very congressional thing to do.

And now the news…

 June 22, 2020
This year, a new coin act might be the making to bring back the Peace and Morgan Silver Dollars in 2021. This will honor the centennial of the transition from the Morgan to the Peace Silver Dollar. However, in the United States, only two commemorative coin programs can be active per year – and Congress has already passed the Law Enforcement Commemorative Coin Act and the Christa McAuliffe Commemorative Coin Act.  → Read more at valuewalk.com

 June 24, 2020
Wayne Fournier was sitting in a town meeting when he had his big idea.  As the mayor of Tenino, Washington (population: 1,884), he’d watched the pandemic rake local businesses.  → Read more at thehustle.co

 June 26, 2020
Gold insider Edmund Moy is all in on gold coins as an investment with prices for the yellow metal on a strong upswing. And he shared with Yahoo Finance how he is protecting his investment. “So I keep a little bit.  → Read more at finance.yahoo.com

 June 26, 2020
U.S. Senators Mike Enzi, R-Wyo., and Maggie Hassan, D-N.H., have introduced bipartisan legislation to allow the U.S. Mint to adjust the metal content of circulating coins in an effort to save taxpayer dollars.  → Read more at highlandcountypress.com

 June 26, 2020
Dive Brief: • The National Grocers Association (NGA) along with five other retail industry groups have called on the federal government to take "rapid action" to address a national coin shortage, according to a press release.  → Read more at grocerydive.com
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Weekly World Numismatic News for June 21, 2020

Welcome to Fabulous Las VegasWhat is likely the first coin show to scheduled since the shutdowns for the COVID-19 pandemic was approved this week. The Vegas Pop Up Coin Show will be held on July 2-5 at the Palace Station Hotel and Casino.

According to the announcement, the show will have only 15 dealers and no more than 25 people staffing dealer tables. The dealers will occupy 24-foot booths to ensure that there is a six-foot distance between people.

Organizers will control the entry to ensure that no more than 50 people are in the room at the same time. All of these measures comply with Nevada’s social distancing regulations.

The organizer appears to have gone to great lengths to organize a coin show and meet the health requirements of the time. If there are any Coin Collectors Blog readers attend this show, I would be happy to post your report. Just contact me with your information.

And now the news…

 June 16, 2020
Kazan Federal University Kazan Federal University, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna, Russia), and Khalikov Institute of Archeology (Tatarstan Academy of Sciences, Kazan, Russia) are working together to study the physical properties of the coins found on the territory of former Volga Bulgaria.  → Read more at phys.org

 June 16, 2020
The cashier at WHSmith clears his throat to make sure Diane von Kesmark, 72, can hear him. 'It's hygiene, madam,' he tells her, emphatically. But he is not referring to the transparent plastic shield separating customers from the till, nor the latex gloves he is wearing to handle goods.  → Read more at thisismoney.co.uk

 June 19, 2020
Palace Station is bringing in the Vegas Pop Up Coin Show — an in-person convention that will set up 15 dealers in an area that usually has 80 exhibitors.  → Read more at 8newsnow.com

 June 20, 2020
VILNIUS (Reuters) – Lithuania began minting a collector's coin, dubbed a "coin of hope", on Wednesday to mark the year of the new coronavirus and pay tribute to doctors, nurses and others who helped the country weather the pandemic.  → Read more at news.yahoo.com

 June 20, 2020
“The flow of coins through the economy has gotten all — it’s kind of stopped," Fed Chair Jerome H. Powell said Wednesday. (Mike Blake/Reuters)  → Read more at washingtonpost.com

 June 20, 2020
Gold has been a highly sought after asset in 2020, with the yellow metal rising by more than 15% in the first five months of the year. Now trading at just below AUD 2,500 per ounce, gold has strongly outperformed most traditional assets including shares, property and term deposits, with this outperformance dating back to early 2000s.  → Read more at themarketherald.com.au
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Weekly World Numismatic News for June 14, 2020

1984 Mexico Libertad

We sold this 1984 Mexico Libertad at auction for a nice premium above spot!

The most interesting news for this week did not come from online sources but an email newsletter for resellers. According to the readers of the newsletter, the best selling items are coins and currency.

According to their survey, most of their readers report that collector coins are outselling all other categories and bringing in the best premiums. The best-sellers are modern bullion coins and Morgan dollars.

Modern bullion coins are not limited to American Eagles. Auction bidders are driving up the prices of Maple Leafs, Britannias, and Libertads. Collector bullion coins, like the American Eagle proofs and Pandas, have realized premiums beyond typical liquidation auctions.

Other categories that are experiencing a spike in sales are mixed lots. Mixed lots of silver U.S. coins are doing the best followed by lots with foreign coins. One dealer sold a lot of 20 holed English pennies for $2.50 per coin. These were coins from the reign of George V and early into Elizabeth II.

Since the readers of the newsletter I receive are dealers in the second-hand and liquidation markets, this is excellent news. The bad news is that it is becoming challenging to find inventory to resell.

And now the news…

 June 5, 2020
A RARE Roman coin discovered in Colchester more than 40 years ago has sold for £4,000 after going under the hammer. Kevin Scillitoe found the coin, minted by the Emperor Carausius, when he was ten-years-old.  → Read more at harwichandmanningtreestandard.co.uk

 June 7, 2020
Arizona history is rife with tales of hidden mines and buried treasure. Even today, those hoping to strike it rich head out with maps and shovels, despite tremendous odds against them. Scott Craven/The Republic  → Read more at lcsun-news.com

 June 7, 2020
As shoppers and retailers do away with cash transactions, we may be witnessing the end of a major source of social and historical information – the coin. In the modern age, coinage is increasingly seen as cumbersome, a vector for disease and costly to manufacture.  → Read more at theconversation.com

 June 8, 2020
Multiculturalism (tolerance) and the ability to unify large different ethnic groups living within the state’s boundaries are those distinct features which serve as the fundamentum for economic, military and cultural achievements of the Western civilization.  → Read more at georgiatoday.ge

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Weekly World Numismatic News for June 7, 2020

2020 Basketball Commemorative Coin ProgramIt is always fun when there is something numismatic to report. This week, the U.S. Mint released the Basketball Hall of Fame Commemorative Coins. The curved or domed coins of the program feature a basketball going into the basket on the reverse or convex side. The reverse features three players reaching for a rebound.

The coins are available as a $5 gold, silver dollar, and clad half-dollar coins in proof and uncirculated finishes. The U.S. Mint is also offering an uncirculated half-dollar in a special folder for kids that will not be available until September.

Introductory pricing for the silver and clad coins expire on July 6. After July 6, the price will go up by $5. The market value of the gold determines the gold coin’s price.

Previously, there was a discussion of a colorized coin. According to the U.S. Mint, it will be available in the future.

The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame is unique amongst sports halls of fame in that enshrinement is not limited to professionals or college players. Inductees include college and professional basketball players, teams, coaches, and broadcasters. From my undergraduate alma mater, the University of Georgia, Theresa Edwards and Katrina McClain are honored alongside Dominique Wilkins.

From Senda Berenson Abbot, the “Mother of Women’s Basketball,” to Pat Summitt, the most successful coach of women’s college basketball, the Hoop Hall presents basketball beyond the NBA.

Although it has been over 20 years since I visited the Hoop Hall, I would recommend that you visit. Maybe you could consider a trip when the Hall reopens.

And now the news…

 May 31, 2020
This is a story about money and the making thereof — literally. This is a story about money and the making thereof — literally. Or maybe it is a recitation and reminder that, although most will make their way honorably through life, some always will take the dishonest route.  → Read more at thisweeknews.com

 June 1, 2020
David Lowe, 55, stumbled across the ‘weirdly relevant’ find among a pile of rubbish while searching land near Rothbury.  → Read more at northumberlandgazette.co.uk

 June 1, 2020
As the coronavirus pandemic hits economies around the world, the tiny Pacific nation of Tuvalu has carved out a lucrative niche — producing designer coins featuring the likes of Star Trek, John Wayne and even Duff Beer.  → Read more at abc.net.au

 June 1, 2020
Money.co.uk has released a new study looking into the different aesthetic attributes of currency on a global scale – even looking into the Pantone references for each too. The results display certain patterns in use of colour, the appearance of different famous people or animals, and proposes what a global currency could look like.  → Read more at itsnicethat.com

 June 2, 2020
The Brasher Doubloon, the first gold coin struck in the U.S., is being offered privately at a $15 million asking price, according to numismatic adviser Jeff Sherid. His firm, Los Angeles-based PCAG Inc., is marketing the coin on behalf of a collector he would only identify as a former Wall Street executive.  → Read more at dailynews.com

 June 3, 2020
Nothing gets a coin collector’s blood going like hearing about a rare coin.  → Read more at worldatlas.com

 June 3, 2020
The Holy Grail of coins has just popped up for sale. The 1787 Brasher Doubloon was the first gold coin struck in the US and represents one of the most important pieces in America’s numismatic history.  → Read more at robbreport.com
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 PCGS & Basketball HOF coins (May 31, 2020)

 

Weekly World Numismatic News for May 31, 2020

Watching the news has been an experience. As a news junkie, I have found myself turning away from all news outlets to maintain a little sanity.

In television news terms, the “A Block” is the news at the beginning of the broadcast until the first commercial. It is where the most important stories are broadcast. Typically, a major derailment of a freight train in Northern Virginia would be an A Block story. On Friday, the 30-second mention was the lead-in to the weather report at 18 minutes after the hour.

The news of the week affects everything, including numismatics. Although the events in Minneapolis, Louisville, and Brunswick, Georgia, have their analogies to problems in the numismatic community, that will be left to another commentary. This week, I want to concentrate on the coronavirus:

  • The pandemic is real and will be around for a while. It is not a government conspiracy. It is not overblown. And stop comparing the numbers of deaths to the flu. The flu kills 56,000 people annually, a 12-month statistic. COVID-19 has killed 104,217 (as of this writing) since FEBRUARY!
  • COVID-19 does not care who you are, your political affiliation, or what you worship. You can be infected. Once infected, you can spread the virus even if you show no symptoms of the disease. History shows us this is possible. Look up the biography of Mary Mallon, better known as “Typhoid Mary.”
  • The more scientists research the disease, the more they realize a lot is unknown. Last week, a preliminary report from a peer-reviewed medical journal revealed that people infected with COVID-19 are showing damage in their lungs. The study included people who did not show symptoms of the disease.
  • Wearing a mask is not infringing on your rights and not a sign of tyranny. It is to protect everyone in the name of public health in the same manner that you are required to wear shirts and shoes when going to a restaurant. Your decision to not wear a mask infringes on my rights not to get infected since the masks are to prevent you from spreading potentially infected droplets from your lungs. If you want to make a statement, get a personalized mask with your message. Wear a t-shirt with your message. But wear the damned mask!
  • And stay six-feet away from me. I would rather be six-feet away from you than six-feet underground!

Although Florida is open and the governor is lifting many restrictions, the Florida United Numismatists canceled the Summer FUN show.

Even though the ANA announced that they continue to plan to hold the World’s Fair of Money in August, sources report that Pittsburgh may not be fully open by then. Even if Pittsburgh is allowed to be in the “Green Phase,” according to the Pennsylvania governor’s plan, “Large Gatherings of More Than 250 Prohibited.”

Also, “All businesses must follow CDC and DOH guidance for social distancing and cleaning” includes dealers at their tables. Some dealers need a lesson in cleanliness and upgrading their people skills making this a barrier to holding the World’s Fair of Money.

Even if the ANA tries to hold the World’s Fair of Money, how many will attend? Are you going to travel in a closed metal tube to a show required to limit attendance? How many ANA members over 60 will attend? How many ANA members are over 60? I am 60 and 4½ hours away by car with friends in Pittsburgh that I would love to visit. I am considering not going under today’s circumstances.

Let’s do the right thing and cancel the World’s Fair of Money before going further embarrasses the organization.

Finally:

WEAR YOUR MASK!
KEEP YOUR SOCIALLY SAFE DISTANCE!
BE SAFE AND HEALTHY!

And now the news…

 May 25, 2020
MLB Legend Walter "Big Train" Johnson recreated a famous myth associated with George Washington  → Read more at medium.com

 May 26, 2020
Australians have been hoarding banknotes during the COVID-19 pandemic. Australians weren't just stockpiling toilet paper during the COVID-19 crisis – they have also been hoarding crisp new banknotes.  → Read more at bellingencourier.com.au

 May 30, 2020
AN NHS worker was left stunned after he discovered a 670-year-old coin which was made shortly after the Black Death in a farmer’s muddy field. Amateur metal detectorist David Lowe, 55, stumbled across the ‘weirdly relevant’ find among a pile of rubbish while searching land near Rothbury, Northumberland.  → Read more at metro.news
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 PCGS & Basketball HOF coins (May 31, 2020)
 2020 SUMMER FUN SHOW CANCELLED (May 26, 2020)

 

Weekly World Numismatic News for May 24, 2020

2020 South Africa Platinum ElephantWhen talking about markets, the central theme is that investors hate instability. Whether the conversation is with the professional market maker or the individual investor, there is much uncertainty in the current marketplace.

When equity markets become unstable, investors run to cash or cash equivalents. Cash equivalents include investments like bonds, especially those issued by stable governments. The other investment they run to is precious metals.

Gold is the primary safe-haven for investors. As a society, we have given this mineral an intrinsic value and trade it for a premium. With the panic of the U.S. Mint closing the West Point Mint for a short time, investors started buying platinum. The most popular form to purchase these metals is in coins where we saw the South African Platinum Elephant coins sell out its 2,000 coin production.

With the markets scrambling, it has opened up the door to scammers trying to cash in on the panic buying. Scammers use tactics like selling overpriced and overhyped coins, counterfeits, and not delivering coins after purchasing.

These scams are not new. Last year, the Accredited Precious Metals Dealer (APMD) program warned against scammers as the prices jumped. Unfortunately, the problem has only become worse.

Please do not fall for these scams. If you have any questions, contact a reputable dealer from the APMD, Professional Numismatists Guild (PNG), Industry Council for Tangible Assets (ICTA), or the American Numismatic Association dealer directories. You will be glad you did!

And now the news…

 May 18, 2020
Nervous investors have been pouring into the gold and silver markets over the past two months. Money Metals Exchange is proud to have helped almost 20,000 new customers with a precious metals purchase in recent weeks, many of whom came over from other dealers struggling with inventory shortages and ridiculous delivery delays.  → Read more at fxstreet.com

 May 19, 2020
While the covid-19 pandemic has had a negative effect on the platinum market — including price, demand and supply — results for Q1 2020 show the net effect is less than feared, and the outlook for 2020 is better than expected, according the latest quarterly report by the World Platinum Investment Council (WPIC).  → Read more at mining.com

 May 21, 2020
Investors seeking a haven from the economic turmoil created by the coronavirus pandemic are snapping up platinum coins engraved with African wildlife.  → Read more at ca.finance.yahoo.com

 May 22, 2020
Kakinada: Cyclonic storm Amphan may have caused heavy damage in parts of Odisha and West Bengal, but the rains it brought in its wake helped unearth a treasure trove of silver coins of British India era in a village in north coastal Andhra.  → Read more at timesofindia.indiatimes.com
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The Passing of Annie Glenn

John and Annie Glenn

Feb 17, 2012 — Mercury astronaut John Glenn and his wife, Annie, pose during a luncheon Feb. 17, 2012, celebrating 50 years of Americans in orbit, an era which began with Glenn’s Mercury mission MA-6, on Feb. 20, 1962.
Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

A big tragedy of the COVID-19 pandemic is the number of historical people who are being fatally stricken by the virus. Today, we learned that Annie Glenn, the surviving wife of astronaut and Senator John Glenn, died of COVID-19 complications. She lived for 100 years.

Annie Glenn was an advocate for those with speech disorders and child abuse. She grew up with a severe stutter that she hid from the public. After undergoing an intensive program at Hollins College, she learned to control her stutter. It gave her the confidence to be an advocate for those who could not speak.

After many years of advocacy, The Annie Glenn Award was created to honor individuals who overcome communications disorders.

Although there have been many deaths during this pandemic, a few have touched the numismatic community. Aside from being the spouse of a famous American, I own a numismatic collectible with her autograph. The $1 silver certificate may not be worth much as a numismatic collectible, but with the passing of John and Annie Glenn, it becomes more precious.

Glenn family autographed “Short Snorter” dated February 24, 1962, four days after Glenn orbited the earth in Friendship 7

Rest in Peace, Annie Glenn.

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