ANA’s 2019 Election Cycle

Members of the American Numismatic Association who opted into online voting should have received the election announcement via email. If you think you did request the electronic voting option and did not receive your notice, check your spam folder.

Those who are not signed up for electronic voting should receive a paper ballot in the mail shortly. Deadline to vote using either method is July 1, 2019.

2019 ANA Election Notice

This year, there are races for president, vice president, and Board of Governors. In addition to the races in all categories, three women are running for the Board of Governors, and five of the candidates are running for the first time. Two are running again after having served in the past.

Three of the current member of the Board of Governors are running for higher office, meaning that there will be at least three new Board members.

Maybe there should be at least four new board members.

It has been a long tradition in United States populist society to “throw the bastards out” dating back to the antebellum South where the southern Democrats ran dirty campaigns and even fixed ballots to weaken the Whig Party that was anti-slavery. Newspapers at the time suggested that if the pols do not protect the southern traditions then vote them out.

Just remember, dirty politics pre-dates the founding of the United States as an independent country. In the 1820s, the movement found a rallying cry.

The ANA has had its “throw the bastards out” situation a few years ago after former ANA Executive Director Larry Shepherd file a lawsuit against the ANA and fired Jeff Shevlin as executive director. It was clear that there were problems, which attracted a large field fo candidates for the seven seats on the Board of Governors. I was one of the candidates.

There was quite a change in made in that election. Unfortunately, a few of the members that were voted in during that election remain. As someone who likes to see change and believes in term limit, anyone elected in 2013 should be retired from the Board of Governors. It has nothing to do with their qualifications, but there is a time for new ideas to replace the old.

Numismatics is not a dying hobby. For as long as physical currency is in use, there will be someone to collect those items and the billions of coins already in collections around the world. But there is some trouble in the hobby.

The ANA has to figure out its long-term direction in the context of today’s society. Kids are no longer checking mom and dad’s pocket change looking for coins. They are not encouraged to do so, but there are no incentives for them to begin. There is no long term encouragement.

We have to adapt to a new way of thinking. Unfortunately, very few of the candidates’ statements show that they are seriously thinking about the future.

Change begins with change. It is time for those who have served to retire from the Board and let others step forward. Let’s thank them for their service and allow them to move on.

It may not be a revolution, but evolution is necessary.

In a few weeks, I will post my endorsements.

Until then, I welcome your thoughts.

Weekly World Numismatic News for May 19, 2019

A Kilwa Coin similar to those found on the beach in Australia (Source: news.com.au)

Five coins were found by a soldier while fishing in 1944. He put the coins away and forgot about them only to rediscover them again in 1979. When he sent them to a museum for identification, they turned out to be over 1,000 years old. A find like this show the coins predate the story of the island’s discovery by James Cook in 1770.

In recent years, the coins have sparked interest in understanding how they ended up in Australia. Even though they are from a time after the arrival of the Aboriginal people, it presents questions as to whether there were other European settlers before James Cook.

Coins are not only a holder of value; they are also a representation of art, history, and commerce. Coins tell us more about our lives than history, which is written by the victors and not the ordinary people who may have done more to guide history than those whose writings may be less than accurate for their glory or the glory of their sponsors. Nowadays, we call that spin.

If finding five coins on a beach in a remote fishing spot in Australia can rewrite history, what will the coins in our pockets tell future generations about us? What stories do any of the coins we collect tell? While it may be nice to hold a mint state 19th-century dollar in our hands, what impact did that worn large cent have on history? Or the history of those who used it?

The term “history in your hand” could never be more impactful than the story of those five coins found while fishing in Australia.

And now the news…

 May 12, 2019

Who needs a boring coin purse when you can surprise shoppers at the cash register by popping the lid on your miniature rice cooker?  → Read more at soranews24.com


 May 13, 2019

Remember when you were taught Australia was first claimed for the British throne when it was discovered in 1770 by James Cook who promptly declared it “terra nullius”?  → Read more at news.com.au


 May 15, 2019

The 10,000-yen (US$92) coin costs a lot more than 10,000 yen.  → Read more at soranews24.com


 May 16, 2019

The Japanese government has announced a new design for the ¥500 coin. The updated version, slated to hit pockets in fiscal 2021, retains the familiar paulownia design but adds a two-tone look and features like microlettering to thwart counterfeiters.  → Read more at nippon.com


 May 16, 2019

QUEEN ELIZABETH II has her portrait printed on every UK coin in circulation, as well as on the coinage of many Commonwealth countries. Now, a Royal Mint designer has shed some light on a coin which is a particular favourite.  → Read more at express.co.uk

Coin Collectors News
news.coinsblog.ws

 

Weekly World Numismatic News for May 12, 2019

The Midwest Collection of Coin Boards (Image courtesy of David Lange)

There are very few people who can amass a collection of everything dealing with one topic. Even the most famous collections limited their scope to something specific. The National Numismatic Collection has its limits. It is why when someone like David Lange makes a significant purchase of coin boards, it is exciting news for the hobby.

Coin boards came before folders and albums. They provided a way for collectors to organize their coin collection. Some dealers used them as an incentive to have people pick coins out of pocket change to sell back to the dealer. The dealer would give the board away with the offer of a reward for bringing it back once it is full of coins.

David Lange is the hobby’s leading expert on coin boards. This past week, Lange announced that he purchased a lot of more than 400 coin boards from a midwest collector dubbed the “Midwest Collection.” The hoard includes several rare coin boards.

Lange’s fascination with coin boards is evident in the three books he has published about them. The most popular is his first book, Coin Collecting Boards of the 1930s & 1940s. It is a recommended book for anyone who wants to know more about numismatic history. He is now selling the book for $19.95 ($14.95 plus $5 for shipping). See his website for more details.

Even if you do not collect coin boards, it is good that there is someone like David Lange to preserve this aspect of the hobby. Otherwise, this aspect of numismatic history would get lost and forgotten. That would be a tragedy.

Congratulation Dave!

And now the news…

 May 5, 2019

The U.S. Mint, Washington, suspended its mutilated coin redemption program this May. The U.S.  → Read more at recyclingtoday.com


 May 7, 2019

The Royal Mint has unveiled a series of special £2 coins to mark 75 years since the D-Day landings. The coins pay tribute to those involved in the events on June 6, 1944, which are widely seen as a key turning point in the Second World War.  → Read more at sports.yahoo.com


 May 9, 2019

How did these two coins, believed to be Spanish pieces dating to the 13th century, get to Glen Canyon NRA?/NPS  → Read more at nationalparkstraveler.org


 May 10, 2019

The Royal Mint produced no £2 or 20p coins in 2017 as people used change in a rush to get rid of their pound coins as the old ones went out of circulation.  → Read more at telegraph.co.uk


 May 11, 2019

Experts believe they may have found a Kilwa coin that could change what we know about the history of global trade  → Read more at theguardian.com


 May 12, 2019

JapanToday Higashi-Azabu IS bldg, 4F 1-8-1 Higashi-Azabu Minato-ku Tokyo 106-0044 Japan Tel: +81 3 5561 7755 Fax: +81 3 5561 7756 Email: editor@japantoday.com ©2019 GPlusMedia Inc.  → Read more at japantoday.com


 May 12, 2019

More than 3,000 4th Century Roman coins were found in a buried pot in Lincolnshire.  → Read more at bbc.com

Coin Collectors News
news.coinsblog.ws

 

IT’S GONE!

After I closed up shop, I did my usual after Saturday chores then sat down to count the change in my cash register. As I counted all of those brown and red Lincolns, I noticed the 1859 Copper-Nickel Indian Head cent was gone.

I am not sure who received it or if my assistant was the one to make sure it found a new home, but it left without any further discussion.

Unfortunately, I found an 1899 Barber dime in the change along with several 1957-D Lincoln cents. On Monday, I will try to give away the Barber dime.

Update on Royal Australian Mint Apollo 11 Commemorative Set

With the pre-sale of the Royal Australian Mint’s 2019 two-coin set honoring the 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11 beginning, a customer service representative from the Mint clarified their shipping policy.

After purchasing the set for AU$177.27 on their website (US$123.96, up 32-cents from yesterday), they charge a flat rate of AU$35.00 (US$22.37) for shipping. Packages are shipped using Auspost eParcel which provides tracking numbers that will be available to users of the U.S. Postal Service’s tracking system.

If there are import fees and taxes, the USPS will collect those from you before delivery.

According to the Royal Australian Mint representative, the 50th Anniversary of the Lunar Landing two Coin Set will not be offered for direct sale in the United States because of licensing agreements. However, that does not affect sales on the secondary market.

Purchasing one set and having it shipped to the United States will cost AU$212.27 (US$148.43) plus surcharges added onto your credit card for the currency exchange.

ANA’s 2019 Election Cycle

Members of the American Numismatic Association who opted into online voting should have received the election announcement via email. If you think you did request the electronic voting option and did not receive your notice, check your spam folder. Those who are not...

read more

Weekly World Numismatic News for May 19, 2019

Five coins were found by a soldier while fishing in 1944. He put the coins away and forgot about them only to rediscover them again in 1979. When he sent them to a museum for identification, they turned out to be over 1,000 years old. A find like this show the coins...

read more

Weekly World Numismatic News for May 12, 2019

There are very few people who can amass a collection of everything dealing with one topic. Even the most famous collections limited their scope to something specific. The National Numismatic Collection has its limits. It is why when someone like David Lange makes a...

read more

IT’S GONE!

After I closed up shop, I did my usual after Saturday chores then sat down to count the change in my cash register. As I counted all of those brown and red Lincolns, I noticed the 1859 Copper-Nickel Indian Head cent was gone. I am not sure who received it or if my...

read more
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