Weekly World Numismatic News for June 16, 2019

British CurrencyWhile the tech world is pushing for a cashless society and those listening with a tin ear follow them down this road beating the drums louder, regulators in the United Kingdom have pledged the ensure that cash remains available.

The Join Authorities of Cash Strategy Group, a UK cooperative agency made up of government finance and trade agencies along with the Bank of England issued a preliminary report that says there is a gap in the availability of cash, especially in less densely populated areas.

According to the research group, only 10-percent of people in the UK have gone cashless. Similarly, the United States, the Federal Reserve reports that 30-percent of all transaction and 55-percent of all purchases under $10 are cashless. The Fed also says that the amount of cash in circulation is rising.

Both the Fed and the Bank of England recognize that while the population centers may have more people considering going cashless, it is not universal across the entire population. Similar to the findings in the UK, less densely populated areas rely on cash more than their urban neighbors. Both countries are finding an increase in the use of debit cards rather than credit cards.

For numismatists, it means that the manufacturers of coins and currency will continue to produce their products, which gives us something to collect. That is good news!

And now the news…

 June 10, 2019

Detectorist Tom Thomas kept the rare artefact for nearly 30 years, not knowing its real value.  → Read more at bbc.com


 June 10, 2019

The South African Reserve Bank (SARB) and the South African Mint yesterday launched a new commemorative coin range of R2 and R5.  → Read more at brandsouthafrica.com


 June 11, 2019

When Kevin-Barry Martin goes for a walk, he’s not only interested in exercising or spending time outdoors. The 42-year-old St. John’s resident is part of a group called Newfoundland History Hunters, and he’s often on the move  → Read more at thechronicleherald.ca


 June 11, 2019

Trade body UK Finance has set up a taskforce, called the Joint Authorities Cash Strategy Group, to ensure cash is kept available to the millions who depend on it.  → Read more at thisismoney.co.uk


 June 12, 2019

Numisbing says it is planning to IPO on Nasdaq First North Stock Exchange in Stockholm next month  → Read more at arabianbusiness.com

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Weekly World Numismatic News for May 5, 2019

In midst of the growing sentiment to rid society of low denomination coins, Britain’s Chancellor of the Exchequer Philip Hammond announced that that the country will continue to produce 1 penny and 2 pence coins.

A study by the British Treasure estimates that 2.2 million people in the U.K. continue to rely on cash for daily commerce. An independent report in the U.K. estimated that more than 8 million people rely mostly on cash. That review concluded, “Poverty is the biggest indicator of cash dependency, not age.”

It is the same argument that is presented in the United States when discussing cash versus electronic payments. Those that would be hurt the most by moving to a cashless society would be the poor, elderly, anyone of modest means, and rural communities. Areas that are not as well served by technology, even in eastern states, will be hurt by the move to a cashless payment model.

Another difference between the United Kingdom and every other country versus the United States is that every other country is not afraid to make changes to protect its change. Countries around the world make a change to their coinage without everyone going into a panic. Although the British went through a row when converting from the round pound to the new 12-sided coin, they forged through the process. Even the mention of a potential change in the composition of U.S. coinage leads to predictions of economic doom and gloom for many sectors of the economy.

The last I looked, the U.K., Canada, and the entire European Union made significant changes in their circulating coinage in the previous 20 years that has not caused a disaster. Change seems to scare many Americans who will do anything to hold on to the past no matter how much it hurts to maintain the status quo. You can look no further than the fuzzy math produced by the Government Accountability Office whose report on the coin versus paper money is an exercise in proving “Figures will not lie, but liars figure.”

And now the news…

 May 2, 2019

Turkish security forces confiscated more than 2,500 Roman and Hellenistic-era coins along with several other historical artifacts in an anti-smuggling…  → Read more at dailysabah.com


 May 5, 2019

COLUMBUS —  The latest budget plan unveiled by Ohio House Republicans would kill a sales tax exemption for investments in coins and precious metal bullion …  → Read more at toledoblade.com


 May 5, 2019

The Treasury decides to continue with copper coins and sets a plan to ensure people have access to cash.  → Read more at bbc.com

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Finally, a Cash Register Find

It has been eight months since I opened my shop of treasures. While I have had fun most of the time one thing that has not happened is a good cash draw find. That is until recently.

1979-P Susan B Anthony Dollar and 2000-P Sacagawea Dollar found in the cash draw

This past week, a customer bought a small item and paid for the under $3 purchase with three coins, a 1979-P Susan B Anthony Dollar, two 2000-P Sacagawea dollars. Of course, given the past problems with confusing a Susie B for a quarter, I took an extra glance at the coin to make sure.

I think the patron was surprised I took the coins without question. I threw the coins in the far left slot and counted out his change. With a quick tear of the receipt and a nod, I thanked the customer for his business and he left.

Later, I was telling someone about the transaction and was told the customer was testing me. Apparently, some people use dollar coins, half dollars and two dollars bills to test the store to see if the store knows enough to take the coins. I was told that the “pass rate” for this test is under 20-percent. I guess I passed!

Earlier today, I passed one of the Sacagawea dollars out for change.

2013 British 10p coin. It looks better in hand!

After hours, when it is time to close the books on the day, I was counting the change in the quarter bin and saw something odd. It was the size of a quarter but shinier. The U.S. Mint does not strike circulation coins this shiny. A closer look revealed that it is a 2013 British ten pence coin.

It’s a cool find and worth 13-cents, but what is it doing in my cash drawer?

I cannot blame anyone because my assistant was not in and I was the only one operating the cash register. I didn’t open a roll taking the blame off the bank. No, this is my fault and I lost 12-cents on the transaction!

I thought I would find a loose Canadian cent or a Jamaican penny mixed in with the copper. Nope! Apparently, I didn’t pay enough attention and was handed 10 pence.

After counting the coins, I replaced the British coin with a U.S. quarter that was in my pocket. My drawer balances but now I have my own lesson to pay attention!

Weekly World Numismatic News for March 10, 2019

2018 Peter Rabbit 50p Uncirculated Coin
(Image courtesy of the Royal Mint)

One of the most disturbing stories relating to numismatics is the conviction of a man for killing someone for his coin collection. In Colchester, England, Gordin McGhee, 52, was stabbed in his flat by Danny Bostock, 33, who broke in to steal a set of Beatrix Potter 50 pence coins.

Both men were familiar with each other from local coin club meetings.

Over the last few years, the English tabloids have been publishing stories about how low-mintage, modern circulating 50p commemorative coins were being sold for hundreds or thousands of pounds on eBay. This has awakened the public about the potential for collecting these coins.

The Royal Mint has been producing 50p coins commemorating the animals featured in Beatrix Potter’s stories since 2016 including Peter Rabbit. By the time the country caught on to their value, the limited edition 2016 and 2017 coins were being hoarded and becoming more difficult to find. People who wanted a complete collection turned to the secondary market.

Of course, where there is a demand the person who can provide a supply can make money.

According to news reports, Bostock snuck into McGhee’s flat to steal his collection of Beatrix Potter coins while McGhee was not home. Unfortunately, McGhee returned home and found Bostock in the act. Bostock stabbed McGhee 17 times and tried to set the place on fire to cover up the crime.

Police were able to track the trail of blood Bostock made with his shoes to Bostock’s home. Bostock was convicted after using the defense that someone else wore his shoes after a drinking party even though the police found the shoes, coins, and the murder weapon in his possession.

Although this type of situation may not happen over the National Parks quarters, we did see the greed of dealers put the public in danger for the release of the 2014 50th Anniversary Kennedy Half-Dollar Gold Proof Coin. Dealers handed out cash to needy people who did not conduct themselves in a manner that is consistent with the ANA Code of Ethics so they could buy the coins first without having to worry about U.S. Mint purchasing limits.

In this case, nothing happened to the dealers who should have been dealt with by the ANA. They could have lost money since the release was not a sellout and the price of gold dropped, but we will never know.

And now the news…

 February 27, 2019

The demand for U.S. cash is skyrocketing — an indicator that’s leaving some economists sounding the alarm.  → Read more at cnbc.com


 March 2, 2019

Charlotte is known for its banks but in some circles, it's known for its actual money. The gold coins that Charlotte's mint produced in the mid-19th century are desirable. "When you're a coin collector, you don't worry sometimes the value.  → Read more at wfae.org


 March 7, 2019

Before immigrating to the United States in 2001, Paul Balan worked as a painter and sculptor in his native Philippines. Now he is pushing his artistic talents in new directions, doing coin and medal designs for the U.S.  → Read more at legion.org


 March 7, 2019

Last August, 90-year-old pensioner Miroslav Jurníček harvested onions from his garden, when he noticed a small golden coin lying on the ground. He started rummaging around and eventually unearthed a vessel full of gold and silver coins.  → Read more at radio.cz


 March 8, 2019

A coin enthusiast has been convicted of murder after stabbing a fellow collector 17 times while trying to steal a rare set of Beatrix Potter 50ps. Danny Bostock, 33, attacked 52-year-old Gordon McGhee in his bedroom before turning on the gas cooker and lighting a dishcloth, seemingly to cause an explosion and destroy evidence of the killing.  → Read more at telegraph.co.uk


 March 8, 2019

From Kew Gardens to Paddington bear, there are a number of rare and collectible 50p coins and the Royal Mint will be releasing a Stephen Hawking coin later this month. The late Cambridge University physics professor died in March last year and the coin will feature a black hole and the scientist himself.  → Read more at manchestereveningnews.co.uk

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Weekly World Numismatic News for March 3, 2019

Royal Mint’s 26 Alphabet 10p Coins
Image courtesy of the Royal Mint

While searching the interwebs for numismatic-related stories there are pointers that lead to the British tabloids. Most of the stories are about the hundreds or thousands of pounds paid for a former circulating coin on eBay. Sometimes, their pages lead to different stories on their site that are very entertaining. Those who have read the New York Post would understand the format.

This is not to say these publications are wrong, but they are prone to hyperbole and exaggeration. Take for example the story “Two million RARE 10p coins enter circulation – get one here” that was posted to the Daily Star’s website this past week.

The title refers to the release of Royal Mint’s “The Great British Coin Hunt of 2019.” Using the same designs as last year, the Royal Mint will place into circulation 10 pence coins with 26 designs representing the letters of the alphabet.

The Great British Coin Hunt started last October with the weekly release of several coins at a time until 2.4 million were placed into circulation. As part of the program, collectors can purchase a special folder from the Royal Mint (£9.90 or about $13.10) or other items to help people collect the coins. The Royal Mint also sells uncirculated 10p coins for £2 each.

If you think that the U.S. Mint overcharges for their products, 10p is worth about 13-cents at the current exchange rate and £2 is about $2.65. Does packaging and other expenses cost $2.52 per coin?

But to call 2.4 million coins rare may a bit of an exaggeration.

Or is it?

If each coin has the same circulation, that means there will be about 92,000 coins per letter. Since the United Kingdom’s population is around 66 million people, that means only one-tenth of one percent of the people can collect these coins.

Maybe the tabloids are not wrong calling 2 million coins “rare!”

And now the news…

 February 25, 2019

From dark designs mourning the dead, to figures celebrating military accomplishments and well-known buildings, Roman coins held by the Otago Museum…  → Read more at odt.co.nz


 February 26, 2019

Originally posted on http://www.1007sandiego.com/story/40029522/a-story-of-honor-the-curious-history-of-military-challenge-coins   If you’re a member of the United States military,…  → Read more at kxxv.com


 February 26, 2019

FRESHLY minted collectable 10p coins are being released this month — and they have a “quintessentially British” theme including tea and fish and chips.  → Read more at dailystar.co.uk


 February 27, 2019

THE ROYAL MINT have announced that they are set to release 26 new designs of 10 pence coins, for its 2019 Great British Coin Hunt collection.  → Read more at express.co.uk


 February 28, 2019

If you lost a coin in Montreal’s west end, there’s a good chance it was picked up by Young S. New. But he didn’t slip that coin in his pocket with the intent of spending it on himself — he picked it up so he could give it away.  → Read more at cbc.ca


 February 28, 2019

The nine British bullion coins were discovered by chance after being hidden near Allington Castle in Kent. Detectives have launched an appeal to return the hoard to its rightful owner.  → Read more at dailymail.co.uk

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Weekly World Numismatic News for November 25, 2018

The 2009 Kew Gardens 50p coin is the rarest of post decimalization circulating commemoratives. The Royal Mint plans to reissue the coin as part of a new commemorative set. (Royal Mint image)

Numismatic news coming out of the United Kingdom is that after seeing the collector price of 50 pence circulating commemorative coins rise, the Royal Mint will be reissuing many of those coins.

Using the designs of some of the most popular coins being traded online, the Royal Mint will be issuing two sets of five commemorative coins to celebrate the 50p coin’s 50th anniversary.

The 50p coin was introduced in 1969 as part of the UK’s transition to decimalization following the introduction of new 5p (to replace the shilling) and 10p (to replace the florin) coins. As the coins began to circulate, some of the lower denominations were withdrawn. On February 15, 1971, British merchants stopped issuing coins that were based on the 240 pence-based Pound and issued change using the decimalization currency known as New Pounds.

Although the coins will be issued as part of commemorative sets with 2019 dates, some feel that the Royal Mint is doing this to manipulate the market to reduce the collector value of its coins. Officials of the Royal Mint has denied the accusation.

Could the reissue of coins with previous designs hurt the value of the collectors market? In the United States, collectors demand the use of classic designs and that has had no impact on the collector market. However, the coins were issued as part of precious metals programs that has almost no competition with the collectible coin market. When was the last time someone decided that the Walking Liberty half-dollar was not worth collecting because the American Silver Eagle uses the same design?

If the Royal Mint mint limits the issue of the coins to the sets they announced, then the awareness of the coins could enhance the British collectors market. However, if the Royal Mint changes their mind and issues the coins for circulation, the collector market could be impacted in a manner similar to the general collectibles market of the 1980s where companies overproduced and overhyped their products.

And now the news…

 November 19, 2018

Tap-and-go payments and the decline of coins are hurting the Royal Australian Mint despite its plan to make up lost revenue with a rise in profits from selling collectors' items and manufacturing currencies for countries overseas.  → Read more at smh.com.au


 November 22, 2018

The 50p was first introduced into circulation in October 1969 and since then dozens of designs have entered the market – many of which could soon make a comeback  → Read more at mirror.co.uk


 November 23, 2018

The Spainhowers’ house burned down in Camp Fire but they found some luck when they uncovered a coin from their honeymoon within the rubble.  → Read more at yahoo.com


 November 25, 2018

The South African Mint, a subsidiary of the South African Reserve Bank has announced its first ever Natura coin in fine silver.  → Read more at businesstech.co.za


 November 25, 2018

Many precious findings are still hidden under the ground.  → Read more at spectator.sme.sk

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Weekly World Numismatic Newsletter for November 4, 2018

What happens when a policy that was supported by a popular vote becomes less popular? You get the situation that the British government faces as Brexit inches closer to its March 2019 execution.

On June 23, 2016, the people of the United Kingdom held a referendum as to whether the country should leave the European Union. The vote and process has been called “Brexit,” a portmanteau of the term “Britain Exit,” as in should Britain exit the E.U.?

Brexit won by a very slim margin.

Chard, a UK coin dealer, created a copper and bronze Brexit medal for the “undecided voters” to flip on election day. They are still available on Chard’s website.

As a result of the Brexit vote, the British Parliament voted to complete the Brexit process in March 2019 and the Prime Minister resigned. PM David Cameron was against Brexit and felt that someone else should lead the government who favored the process. Theresa May was selected to be Britain’s second female Prime Minister and will lead the country through Brexit.

However, polls in Britain show that Brexit is no longer as popular as it was in 2016. These polls were taken following the announcement that the Royal Mint mint will be producing a 50-pence coin commemorating Brexit next March.

Although the coin has yet to be designed, the British tabloids, especially those who have soured on Brexit, have been running editorials with anti-Brexit mockups. With these mock-ups frequently appearing in Britain’s newspapers, polls are showing that the pre-Brexit election support of nearly 49-percent has eroded to 37-percent.

Opinions on the concept of a Brexit coin are almost evenly split with 37-percent in favor of the coin, 34-percent against, and 29-percent with no comment or opinion.

In the United States, the only way to raise public passion about a coin is for it to have an error, such as the “Godless Dollars” for coins missing their edge lettering and the motto “In God We Trust.” Otherwise, only we numismatists care.

At least the Brits are paying attention!

And now the news…

 October 30, 2018

View photosMore A special 50p is just one of the many changes Britain’s departure from the UK will bring. The commemorative coin, which is expected to carry the words “Friendship With All Nations” will be available from March 29 – the day the UK leaves the EU.  → Read more at finance.yahoo.com


 October 30, 2018

New collectors' coins commemorating statesman Ignacy Jan Paderewski are to be released on Tuesday, in a year in which Poland marks its independence centenary. Paderewski's is the fourth coin in a series issued by the National Bank of Poland.  → Read more at thenews.pl


 October 31, 2018

“II am visiting this gallery for the second time in a month,” says Ayushi, a New Delhi-based history honours student. “The glimpse into the past is so fascinating that I have brought along my friends to have a first-hand experience of the remarkable collection of Indian currency,” she adds.  → Read more at gulfnews.com


 November 1, 2018

The Royal Australian Mint wants you to be on the lookout for $1 coins specially marked with A, U or S.  → Read more at abc.net.au


 November 2, 2018

Increased gold buying by consumers and central banks pushed overall demand for the yellow metal up slightly in the third quarter, according to the World Gold Council's Gold Demand Trends 2018 Report.  → Read more at seekingalpha.com

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Weekly World Numismatic News for September 30, 2018

2014 £2 coin commemorating the 100 year anniversary of the start of World War I is one of the coins the British tabloids watch.

Since the Bank of England transitioned from the old round pound to the new 12-sided pound coin, the British tabloids have been watching the online auctions, primarily eBay, to sensationalize the price of coins being bought-and-sold by collectors.

Most of the coins were circulating commemorative 50 pence, one and two-pound coins ranging from the coin commemorating the end of slavery in England to Peter Rabbit commemorating the work of Beatrix Potter.

While searching the internet for numismatic-related news, there is at least one tabloid writing about yet another find and how someone sold it for thousands of pounds on eBay. After tweeting one of those stories, a British collector responded and we had an email conversation about the stories.

According to my correspondent, it seems that the tabloids are making more out of the story than necessary. Using the information from my correspondent, I began to watch the eBay UK auction results.

Although it is true that some of these coins are selling for hundreds and even thousands of pounds, most of the buyers are not from the UK. According to one eBay seller, most of his buyers were from the Middle East and Southeast Asia.

Another seller said that finding one in pocket change, as suggested by the tabloid, is not going to make anyone rich. The coins that are selling at high multiples are uncirculated coins pulled from rolls they purchased from the Royal Mint.

Not all of the coins are selling at high prices. One seller said that he sold most of a roll to people from the European Union for a few euros plus shipping. While they are making money, they are not getting rich as suggested by the tabloids.

The tabloids have been helpful in raising awareness for some of these coins. In the past, one person said she would buy three or four rolls of the 50 pence coins and would sell them over time. She had rolls at least five years old before it became a topic in the tabloids.

Coin roll hunting became instantly popular throughout the UK. Some banks report that there is a higher demand for rolls of 50p coins than usual. The demands coincide with the report of another coin being sold for thousands of pounds on eBay.

If there is good news in this, the UK error collectors are finding fresh material. With so many people looking closely at the coins they receive in change and from the bank, more errors are appearing in the collector market. But the increased supply without a similar increase in demand has kept the prices down. Error collectors are afraid that once people realize that this is not a credible get-rich-quick scheme, the number of people looking for errors will diminish.

And now the news…

 September 23, 2018

Bangladesh Bank established the museum, the first of its kind in the country, beside the Bangladesh Bank Training Academy with a collection of over three thousand coins and currency notes  → Read more at dhakatribune.com


 September 24, 2018

Sofia, Bulgaria –  → Read more at euscoop.com


 September 27, 2018

It’s a hobby for Garrison Garrow, and his efforts are renowned.Garrow, of Akwesasne, designed the new Royal Canadian Mint collector coin ($30), which was unveiled recently at McGill Universit…  → Read more at standard-freeholder.com


 September 28, 2018

The Bulgarian National Bank has issued (17th September) the fifth entry in a series of coins entitled “Medieval Bulgarian Rulers,” which has been issued intermittently since 2011. The latest coin features the Bulgarian ruler Ivan Asen II (circa.  → Read more at novinite.com

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Weekly World Numismatic News for August 26, 2018

News out of the United Kingdom was that the Bank of England was thinking about eliminating the copper 1 penny and 2 pence coins. The discussion came from a blog post on the website Bank Underground, an independent blog written by Bank of England staff commenting on the Bank’s policies. The post suggested that there would be “a negligible impact on inflation, with the average impact being negative but not statistically different from zero.”

The economists that wrote the blog post has used the same argument that many others have used: the rising cost of copper and the reduced purchasing power makes the coin not worth minting.

In response, the Bank of England said that it was not considering eliminating the 1p and 2p coins.

Unfortunately, the Bank of England economists’ post will become fodder for those that want to eliminate the one-cent coin in the United States. The argument will repeat the same themes that the blog post outline as proof that this could be done.

The problem is that regardless of the position, using the arguments generated from data that does not consider social and economic information from the United States makes the using this as an example irrelevant or spurious at best.

And now the news…

 August 18, 2018

A block below Central Park in Manhattan, an unassuming shop appears, from the vantage point of sidewalk passersby, old, dusty, and uninteresting. Yet it contains treasures. In billboard-laden New York City, the boutique’s beige awning barely snatches a glance.  → Read more at fortune.com


 August 18, 2018

AGARTALA: A commemorative gold coin to honour Maharaja Bir Bikram Manikya has been launched on the occasion of the 110th birth anniversary of 'Tripura's last king'. The coin was released at a special Independence Day function at Ujjayanta Palace – the seat of the Manikya dynasty – by chief minister Biplab Deb, who was accompanied at the event by deputy chief minister Jishnu Dev Varma, who is a member of the royal family, and the Maharaja's granddaughter Maharajkumari Pragya Deb Burman.  → Read more at timesofindia.indiatimes.com


 August 19, 2018

RIGA — The whole mintage of the new silver collector coin dedicated to the Curonian Kings, a cultural group of free Latvian peasants that for many centuries inhabited seven villages in western Latvia, has been sold out at Bank of Latvia Cashier’s Offices, the central bank’s spokesman Janis Silakalns told LETA.  → Read more at baltictimes.com


 August 20, 2018

The Royal Australian Mint is paying homage to a group of iconic Ford and Holden race cars from the likes of Peter Brock, Allan Moffat, Dick Johnson and Craig Lowndes in a new series. Two fresh collections feature seven, uncirculated 50cent coins each from Ford and Holden chronicling the success of the brands in Australian motorsport.  → Read more at supercars.com


 August 22, 2018

Bank of England economists have reignited the debate over the future of 1p and 2p coins, arguing their removal from circulation would not stoke inflation. In a blog post on Wednesday the analysts said their work and the “overwhelming” evidence suggested the withdrawal of coppers would have “no significant impact on prices”.  → Read more at theguardian.com


 August 23, 2018

THE Bank of England is considering plans to scrap the one and two pence coins. It comes after economists claimed that scrapping 1p and 2p coins would not push up inflation. Here’s the latest…  → Read more at thesun.co.uk

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 NLG announces 2018 awards (Aug 20, 2018)

Weekly World Numismatic Newsletter for March 18, 2018

When news comes out of the United Kingdom it is fun to read how the British tabloids write about them. They have a way with their words that make no doubt about where they stand.

Philip Hammond has branded a ‘penny-pincher’ after revealing shock plans to scrap 1p and 2p coins (Courtesy of The Sun)

This past week, the tabloids had their fun poking at Philip Hammond, Chancellor of the Exchequer, who suggested that the country no longer produce 1p and 2p coins. He also questioned whether it was to the country’s advantage to eliminate the £50 note.

Chancellor of the Exchequer is to the United Kingdom as the Secretary of the Treasury is to the United States.

During Hammond’s review of the treasury, he said that since 500 million 1p and 2p coins fall out of circulation every year that it might be a good idea to eliminate them.

Hammond is a member of the Conservative Party. Following his statements on the State of the Treasury, MP (Member of Parliament) Wes Streeting, a member of the Labour Party, referred to Hammond as “this penny pincher Chancellor.”

That opened the tabloids and other opposition parties to attack Hammond and the Tories. Much like the argument against eliminating the one-cent coin in the United States, those against removing those coins worry about squeezing the poor a few pennies at a time (allegedly) making their situation worse.

For the £50 note, Hammond cites studies about its use in organized crime for physical payments. However, studies show that the criminals are more apt to use the 500€ note, while it is still in circulation, the 100&euro note, and the $100 Federal Reserve Note. Even with the strong exchange rate being strong on the pound sterling, it is more advantageous for criminals to use higher denomination banknotes.

Prime Minister Theresa May, who has the final say, gave the British press a non-committal statement following the opposition attack. Of course, that opened her up to being called whishy-washy by the tabloids.

The British tabloids do make the news entertaining!

And not the news…

 March 11, 2018

Whether a modern quarter displaying a U.S. national park or a rare, hand-hammered Greek denarius dating back to 250 A.D., history is woven throughout the process and story of all coins, tokens and currencies, according to Monte Mensing, president of the Springfield Coin Club. → Read more at registerguard.com


 March 12, 2018

GAYLORD — When Kandus Schalter received a “challenge coin” from Matt Barresi, director of the Gaylord Regional Airport, she thought she might just keep it in her wallet. But Frank Jasinski thought Schalter, a World War II veteran and local businesswoman with strong ties to the community, should be able to wear it proudly, so he offered to take it to Hogan’s Jewelers, to put a hole and catch in it. → Read more at petoskeynews.com


 March 12, 2018

On Monday, March 12, the National Bank of Ukraine introduces a commemorative coin "The Day of the Ukrainian Volunteer". This was reported by the press service of the bank. The nominal value of the coin is 10 UAH, metal is a zinc-based alloy, the circulation is 1 million pieces. → Read more at 112.international


 March 12, 2018

The Treasury could be paving the way for the end of 1p and 2p coins as it seeks views on the future of cash. It is inviting comments on the mix of coins in circulation as consumers move to non-cash payments such as contactless and digital spending. → Read more at bbc.com


 March 13, 2018

PHILIP Hammond was branded a “penny-pincher” after revealing shock plans to scrap 1p and 2p coins. Unveiling his Spring Statement, the Chancellor resurrected proposals to abolish the “obsolete” copper change. → Read more at thesun.co.uk


 March 15, 2018

The National Bank of Ukraine (NBU) has decided to stop striking coins of low denominations — 1 kopiyka, 2 kopiykas, 5 kopiykas, 25 kopiykas coins, acting NBU Governor Yakiv Smolii has said. “The National Bank stops striking 1 kopiyka, 2 kopiykas, 5 kopiykas, 25 kopiykas coins. All these denominations of coins will be in circulation, but in the … → Read more at kyivpost.com


 March 16, 2018

A pot of 500 gold and silver coins dating to the 15th century was discovered in the Netherlands. → Read more at livescience.com


 March 16, 2018

The five dollar gold coin is the first time the Mint has ever issued currency in a pink hue. → Read more at usatoday.com


 March 16, 2018

Utility workers in the Netherlands struck gold while laying drain pipe at a construction site earlier this month. The employees of Oasen, a water supply company, unearthed a collection of nearly 500 coins in a glazed cooking pot dating back to the 15th century, the NL Times reported — 12 of them gold and the remaining silver. → Read more at nydailynews.com

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