Lew gives us some Lewpts

Lew Signing CeremonyIn one of those news items from while I was away, Secretary of the Treasury Jacob J. “Jack” Lew put pen to official paper and provided an autograph that will appear on United States Federal Reserve Note. Treasury reports that Lew’s signature will first appear on Series 2013 five-dollar notes that will be issued this fall. No plans were announced for other denominations.

Lew, whose autograph has been called “lewpty” and been compared to the decorative icing on a Hostess cupcake, made a promise to the president that he would do better with his penmanship. During his confirmation hearing, Lew told Sen. Max Baucus (D-MT), Chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, that he promised the president he would do better. This did not satisfy those with an ironic sense for the different when a petition appeared on the White House website to “Save the Lewpty-Lew.”

Mock-up of how Treasury Secretary Jack Lew’s autograph will appear on the Series 2013 $5 Federal Reserve Note in the Fall.

Mock-up of how Treasury Secretary Jack Lew’s autograph will appear on the Series 2013 $5 Federal Reserve Note in the Fall.

Remember as you were growing up spending time with a piece of paper practicing your signature? I wonder if Lew was doing this in his spare time?

While Lew’s autograph lost many of his infamous lewpts at least he did not go to the extreme that of predecessor, Tim Geithner. Geithner’s autograph was very readable and lacked character. At least Lew kept some of his lewpts. It will make for interesting conversations for currency collectors in the future as they examine the autographs on their collectibles.

Images courtesy of the U.S. Department of the Treasury.

Lew Looses Lewpts

MSNBC on-air comparison of Jack Lew's autographAlthough new currency with the autograph of Secretary of the Treasury Jacob “Jack” Lew have yet to be issued, Treasury documents signed by Lew have been seen with a new autograph.

During his confirmation hearings, it was reported that Lew told Sen. Max Baucus (D-Montana) that he made to the president “to make at least one letter legible.” It looks like he has made more than one letter legible based on the image broadcast by MSNBC.

Lew is not the only Treasury Secretary to change his autograph. Timothy Geithner did the same on his appointment. When asked about his autograph, Geithner said, “Well, I think on the dollar bill I had to write something where people could read my name. That’s the rationale.”

Not every autograph on U.S. currency could be considered legible. You can see all of the autographs on small size currency (since 1928) on this page at uspapermoney.info.

I wish Lew kept his lewpts!

A mock-up of what Jack Lew's original signature would look like on a one-dollar note

A mock-up of what Jack Lew’s original signature would look like on a one-dollar note

Jack Lew autograph examples courtesy of MSNBC.
Tim Geithner autograph examples courtesy of American Public Media

Lew brings his lewpts to Treasury

75th Secretary of the Treasury Jacob "Jack" Lew

The 75th Secretary of the Treasury Jacob “Jack” Lew

On a 71 to 26 vote, Jacob Joseph “Jack” Lew will be sworn in to become the 75th Secretary of the Treasury.

The White House release a statement from the president following the confirmation of his former Chief of Staff saying “here is no one more qualified for this position than Jack.”

Aside from being in charge of the department that includes the U.S. Mint and the Bureau of Engraving and Printing, currency collectors now get to look forward to the addition of Lew’s “Lewpty” autograph on United States currency. When Lew was nominated to succeed Tim Geithner, it was joked that Lew’s autograph resembled a series of loops or the icing decoration on the Hostess Cupcake. There was even a petition on the White House website to “Save the Lewpty-Lew” autograph on U.S. currency (the petition ended and can no longer be found on the White House’s website).

Given the realities of the Treasury and our current economics, we wish Jack Lew well in his new position. We also hope he does not follow through on the promise he told Sen. Max Baucus (D-Montana) he made to the president “to make at least one letter legible.”

Please Mr. Secretary, Save the Lewpty Lew!

A mock-up of what Jack Lew's signature would look like on a one-dollar note

A mock-up of what Jack Lew’s signature would look like on a one-dollar note

Credits

  • Picture of Jack Lew courtesy of Wikipedia.
  • Dollar Bill mock-up with Lew’s Loops courtesy of New York Magazine.

Jovita Carranza nominated to be Treasurer

Jovita Carranza

The White House announced on Friday that Jovita Carranza will be nominated for Treasurer of the United States. Carranza had been a member of Trump campaign National Hispanic Advisory Council met with Trump in December about a position. Currently, she is acting director of the Small Business Administration.

The following biographical note was released by the White House:

Ms. Carranza currently is the Founder of JCR Group which provides services to companies and non-governmental organizations. She previously served as Deputy Administrator of the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) under President George W. Bush, after receiving unanimous confirmation. Prior to her service in SBA, Carranza had a distinguished career at United Parcel Service where she started as a part-time, night-shift box handler and worked her way up to be the highest ranking Latina in company history where she served as president of Latin America and Caribbean operations. Ms. Carranza earned her MBA from the University of Miami in Florida. She also has received executive, management and financial training at the INSEAD Business School in Paris, France; Michigan State University; and the University of Chicago.

When confirmed Carranza will be the 44th Treasurer of the United States succeeding Rosie Rios who resigned on July 8, 2016.

Since the Series 2017 notes will carry Carranza and Secretary of the Treasury Steven T. Mnuchin’s signature, here is a view of what you might expect:

 
Rather ordinary considering the fun we had discussion Jack Lew’s Lewpts!

Signature images courtesy of CNN Money.

Counting Down the Top 10 of 2013

It is that time of then when the pundit class of this country puts together their list of the best, worst, or most impactful stories of the year being concluded. There was even an advertisement on satellite radio about an upcoming show that will list the Top 10 moments in music for 2013. After a meeting of the Board of Directors for the Coin Collectors Blog (all three of us: me, myself, and I), the last ten days of the year will count down what we feel are the Top 10 Numismatic-Related Stories of 2013.

Number 10: Lew’s Lewpts

75th Secretary of the Treasury Jacob "Jack" Lew

75th Secretary of the Treasury Jacob “Jack” Lew

In one of the more fun stories of 2013 started following the nomination of Jacob “Jack” Lew to succeed Timothy Geithner as Secretary of the Treasury. One of the “issues” surrounding Lew’s nomination was that his autograph was far from conventional. As one of the co-signers of U.S. currency, collectors became interested in what the new autograph would look like. On one hand there were the series of loops that Lew has passed off as his autograph even while a member of the White House staff. On the other was the alleged promise Lew gave the president to provide a clearer signature for U.S. currency.

Lew, whose autograph has been called “lewpty” and been compared to the decorative icing on a Hostess cupcake, made a promise to the president that he would do better with his penmanship. During his confirmation hearing, Lew told Sen. Max Baucus (D-MT), Chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, that he promised the president he would do better. This did not satisfy those with an ironic sense for the different when a petition appeared on the White House website to “Save the Lewpty-Lew.”

MSNBC on-air comparison of Jack Lew's autographs: the original Lewpts on the left and what will appear on U.S. currency to the right.

MSNBC on-air comparison of Jack Lew’s autographs: the original Lewpts on the left and what will appear on U.S. currency to the right.

The other signature on U.S. currency is that of Rosa “Rosie” Gumataotao Rios, Treasurer of the United States. Rios was sworn in as Treasurer on August 20, 2009 and has served in that office ever since. Rios’s signature appears with former Secretary of the Treasury Timothy F. Geithner on Series 2009 notes. Ironically, Geithner also changed his signature when he became secretary.

Rosie Rios signature on the older (Series 2009) $100 Federal Reserve Note

Rosie Rios signature on the older (Series 2009) $100 Federal Reserve Note

Notes that will include Jack Lew’s signature will appear on all Series 2009-A notes.

Glad we were able to resolve this pressing issue!

Pin It on Pinterest

%d bloggers like this: